125 results for “Chicago (Ill.)”

Photograph of Lucy Parsons

Parsons self-identified as Native American and Chicana. Her family said she was black. Parsons grew up in Texas where she met Albert Richard Parsons in 1869. They married in 1872, although there is not a marriage license on record, and they moved to Chicago in 1873. Lucy Parsons was a prominent figure in Chicago's anarchist and radical labor circles until her death in 1942.

Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Parsons, Lucy
College of Complexes logo

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum. This image captures one of the College's logos.

Creator
Pastin, Pat
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Advertisement for a lecture by Dr. Magnus Hirshfeld, Chicago, 1931.

Magnus Hirschfeld, an openly gay German physician, was a long-time advocate of human rights for sexual minorities. He founded the Scientific Humanitarian Committee in 1897 to advocate for the decriminalization of homosexuality in Germany and the World League for Sexual Reform on a Scientific Basis in 1928. Hirschfeld's lecture at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club in 1931 was said to have drawn an audience of over 300.

Creator
Dill Pickle Club
Date
1931
Subjects
Advertising
Gender and society
Homosexuality
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Lumber on the docks, Chicago

A view of Chicago's lakefront lumber docks. Ships arrived here from ports in the upper Great Lakes and transferred their cargo to waiting rail cars. The lumber appears to be telegraph poles.

Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Industry
Lumber
Railroads
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Lake Michigan
Anti-War Dance, 1918

Chicagoans organized many protests against American involvement in World War I, including this Anti-War Dance sponsored by the bohemian Dill Pickle Club. Critics of the war charged that large manufacturers were the most likely to profit from the war while workers were the most likely to die in the trenches. The war deeply divided Chicago's radicals. Some believed that it was necessary to remain loyal to the government once Congress declared war. Others urged active resistance to mobilization and the draft.

Date
1918
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
World War I
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Report from M. Butler to E.M. Graham, May 11, 1937

The report of an undercover agent to the Pullman Company. Since the late 19th century, the Pullman Company employed African Americans as service workers on its sleeping cars. By the 1920s it was one of the largest industrial employers of African American workers, enjoying a reputation for paternalism. Beginning in the mid-1920s the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph sought to unionize the porters and maids of the Pullman Company. Like other industrial employers, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management.

Date
May 11, 1937
Subjects
African Americans
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Unions
Working class
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Main Gate to Works, Pullman

Workers leave the Pullman Palace Car Works, 1893. This picture appeared in a promotional booklet celebrating the paternalistic labor policies of George Pullman. A year later Pullman's workers were at the center of a national strike of rail workers that failed after federal troops intervened.

Date
1893
Subjects
Industry
Pullman Company
Railroads
Working class
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
E.F. Garry to Mr. Lane on Pullman Saving Plan

In the 1920s a growing number of large industrial employers developed welfare, recreation, and representation programs for their employees. This letter, between executives of the Pullman Company, explores the possibility of a company organized savings and investment plan for workers who built, repaired, and serviced railroad cars. Written shortly after the 1922 nationwide strike of railroad shop workers, the letter offers clues as to why employers favored such welfare programs.

Date
1922
Subjects
Industry
Labor
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Composite of Chicago

A view of Chicago showing ships in the harbor. Surrounding the cityscape are images of prominent buildings. The city's motto “Urbs in Horto” is surrounded by symbolic images.

Date
1857
Subjects
Advertisements
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Speech of John Hossack on the Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 required the federal government to assist with retrieving runaway slaves even in free states like Illinois. In an act of civil disobedience, businessman John Hossack and seven others helped a runaway slave named Jim Grey escape from federal custody just as he was about to be sent back South. Convicted in a Chicago court, Hossack paid a $100 fine and spent ten days in jail, although he was released each day to dine with Chicago officials and prominent citizens. In his strongly worded defense, Hossack argued, “the parties who prostituted the constitution to the support of slavery, are traitors.”

Creator
Hossack, John
Date
1860
Subjects
Law
Slavery