125 results for “Chicago (Ill.)”

Panorama of State Buildings from Northwest, 1893 World's Fair

A leading photographer of the American West, Jackson made the official set of views for the Exposition.

Creator
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942
Date
1895
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago Under the Mob

When Frederic Remington wrote and illustrated this article about labor unrest in Chicago he was already a well-known for his images of western themes. The text describes Chicago's immigrant workers as an uncivilized and violent mob. The troops sent to restore order, Remington points out, had recently participated in the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1895
Subjects
Labor
Pullman Company
Pullman Strike, 1894
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Bridge over the Chicago River

A streetcar crosses one of the the many bridges over the Chicago River. Two large clothing manufacturing businesses are situated on the right side of the bridge.

Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Bridges
Chicago River
Industry
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
Help Lift the Lid

An advertisement for an evening at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club.

Date
[1920 or 1926]
Subjects
Advertising
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Entertainment
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago lakefront

This image was taken from an elevated position on the west side of Michigan Avenue overlooking Grant Park in Chicago. Docked along the shore are ferries to the World's Fair several miles to the south. Men and women sit on park benches in the foreground.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
1893
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Lake Michigan
College of Complexes curriculum, March 1965

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
March 1965
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago American Indian Conference, 1961

In 1961, a week-long gathering at the University of Chicago attracted hundreds of Indian people from across the country. The Chicago American Indian Conference resulted in a Declaration of Indian Purpose and helped mobilize a generation of Indian activists. This photograph illustrates both the broad representation at the conference and the growing strains of generational conflict. Attendees included Irene Mack (Menominee) at the microphone; fourth row right Father Peter Powell; third row right, second from aisle Clyde Warrior (Ponca), Mel Thom (Northern Pauite), and Leo La Clair (Muckleshoot).

Creator
Weil, F. Peter
Date
1961
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Map of Chicago in 1830 (published in 1886)

Published an 1886 history of Chicago, this map recalls a time when the city was a frontier settlement. Visible on the map are the homes and businesses of early residents as well as indications of landmarks of 1886. Maps like these suggested the rapid changes taking place in American cities during the 19th century.

Creator
Andreas, A. T. (Alfred Theodore), 1839-1900
Date
1886
Subjects
Mapping
Urbanization
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Dill Pickle Tea Room

This advertisement from the Dill Pickle Club suggests some of the appeal of bohemian night spots: conversation, special parties, and “atmosphere.”

Date
ca. 1928
Subjects
Advertising
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Scene of Destruction and Pillage in the Panhandle Yards

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
July 8, 1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)