50 results for “Industrial Workers of the World”

The Garment Workers' Strike

In 1910 and 1915, tens of thousands of Chicago garment workers, many of them young immigrant women, took to the streets to protest their working conditions. Many of the female leaders of the strike were affiliated with the Women's Trade Union League (WTUL), a national organization that sought better conditions for working women through unionization and education.

Date
1915
Subjects
Gender and society
Strikes and lockouts
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
The Liberty Bond Mutual Benefit Association-The Money is Mostly Spent at Home

The U.S. entered Europe's Great War in 1917 as a deeply divided nation. To rally the country to the cause of war, the federal government launched a massive public relations effort drawing on the most talented communicators in business, journalism, and government. In this advertisement from the Chicago Tribune of October 1917, popular cartoonist John T. McCutcheon encourages Americans to support the war effort by purchasing government bonds. With the letters US in the background, a circle of men representing different occupations is united by Liberty Bonds. The poster suggests that only un-American outsiders would refuse to support the bond drive.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1917
Subjects
World War I
The Riot at Forty-Ninth Street, 1894

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
The Season in Full Swing at the Dill Pickles

An advertisement for a week of events at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club suggests the eclectic mix of radicalism and ribaldry typical of the club. During the fall of 1930 Mae West's melodrama “Sex” played at Chicago's Garrick Theater promising audiences “55 people” on stage and “555 Thrills.” Earlier in the year, West became an unlikely icon of free speech when she prevailed over New York City prosecutors who accused her of producing obscene plays. Hypolite Havel was an anarchist intellectual and former associate of Emma Goldman. Ralph Chaplin was an editor and illustrator for the Industrial Workers of the World and the author of the labor anthem “Solidarity Forever.”

Date
1930
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Types and Development of Man

An illustration from the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, conveys the racialist thinking common at the time.

Creator
Buel, James W., 1849-1920
Date
1904
Subjects
World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904
Ukrainian-Canadian Festival, Saskatoon

A man and woman in traditional dress dance atop a map of Canada. As part of its plan to populate the western provinces the Canadian government encouraged immigration from many European countries. Before World War I cut off trans-Atlantic migration, more than 150,000 Ukrainians had settled in Canada, many of them in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Thousands more arrived in the 1920s. Non-British immigrants often experienced discrimination at the hands of native-born Canadians, and were encouraged to abandon their language and traditional clothes. During World War I, thousands of Ukrainians were imprisoned because they were originally from Canada’s enemy, the Austrian Empire. By the late 1940s, some of the prejudice had tempered as immigrants and their children claimed the right to be Canadians and immigrants.

Creator
Association of Ukrainian Canadians
Date
July 31, 1946
Subjects
Dancers
Immigration
Places
Saskatchewan
View North From Colonnade, 1893 World's Fair

A leading photographer of the American West, Jackson made the official set of views for the Exposition.

Creator
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942
Date
1895
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Wild Rivalries of Savage, Barbarous and Civilized Races

Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West show highlighted the horse-riding traditions of many countries, while always depicting white Americans as the most advanced. The three-way division of races between “savage” (Indians), “barbarous” (non-Christian), and “civilized” (white Europeans) was a common feature of racialist thinking at the turn of the 20th century.

Creator
Courier Litho. Co.
Date
c . 1896
Subjects
Race
Wild west shows
World Fashions Make Aurora a Style Center

In the 1920s and 1930s, the International Corset Company of Aurora, Illinois was a major manufacturer of foundation garments. During the 1920s it sponsored the International School of Scientific Corsetry to provide training to corset salespeople. For the Aurora centennial in 1937, the company boasted that its international reputation put Aurora on the map of world fashion.

Creator
Zak, Karel J.
Date
1937
Subjects
Advertising
Gender and society
Industry
World's Fair worker's passbook

Christina Olson was engaged at the age of twelve to perform as a Turkish dancer in the Turkish Theater, Midway Plaisance, World's Columbian Exposition, for the summer of 1893.

Date
1893
Subjects
Christina Olson
Dance
Theater
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)