50 results for “Industrial Workers of the World”

Cheap Farms for Settlers

A broadside advertising land for sale in western Iowa. In addition to selling farm land, the American Emigrant Company recruited European workers and farmers to migrate to the western United States, arranged their travel and work contracts, and handled money sent home by immigrants. Prominent business and political leaders were major investors in the company.

Date
1865
Subjects
Advertisements
Education
Farming
Immigration
Railroads
Places
Iowa
English lessons

Finnish-speaking lumber workers in Duluth, Minnesota, learn English through a class in parliamentary procedure. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries tens of millions of farmers and workers from Europe, Asia, and Latin America moved to North America in search of work. Although anti-immigrant sentiment, and sometimes violence, was common in the U.S. and Canada, governments and private agencies also tried to teach immigrants the culture and language of their adopted land. In some cases, immigrants eagerly participated in these “Americanization” and Canadianization” programs, especially when immigrants considered the programs helpful to their own goals. But in other cases, immigrants rejected and resented forced conformity.

Date
1930s
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Minnesota
City of Industry, Hamilton, Ontario, 2007

A steel mill releases smoke and flames into the sky above Hamilton, Ontario. A working class neighborhood is visible in the foreground bordering the industrial plant. Since the late 19th century Hamilton has been one of Canada's major industrial centers and home to an activist labor movement. Despite a shift to service industries, it remains home to Canada's two largest steel mills.

Creator
Walsh, Chris P.
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Places
Canada
Ontario
J. W. Noseworthy and his class at the Hollinger Mine

A group of immigrant miners learns English in a “Frontier College” classroom. During the early 20th century, Canadian mining, timber, and railroad companies recruited thousands of young men from Europe to work as wage laborers. Living in remote work camps, workers endured difficult conditions and had little contact with mainstream Canadian society. The “Frontier College” was an effort to bring Canadian culture to these workers, teach them English, and discourage radicalism. Young Canadian men, like J.W. Noseworthy pictured here, lived and worked alongside immigrants, and during the evening offered classes and access to reading materials.

Date
1914
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Canada
Ontario
Report from M. Butler to E.M. Graham, May 11, 1937

The report of an undercover agent to the Pullman Company. Since the late 19th century, the Pullman Company employed African Americans as service workers on its sleeping cars. By the 1920s it was one of the largest industrial employers of African American workers, enjoying a reputation for paternalism. Beginning in the mid-1920s the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph sought to unionize the porters and maids of the Pullman Company. Like other industrial employers, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management.

Date
May 11, 1937
Subjects
African Americans
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Unions
Working class
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
E.F. Garry to Mr. Lane on Pullman Saving Plan

In the 1920s a growing number of large industrial employers developed welfare, recreation, and representation programs for their employees. This letter, between executives of the Pullman Company, explores the possibility of a company organized savings and investment plan for workers who built, repaired, and serviced railroad cars. Written shortly after the 1922 nationwide strike of railroad shop workers, the letter offers clues as to why employers favored such welfare programs.

Date
1922
Subjects
Industry
Labor
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Main Gate to Works, Pullman

Workers leave the Pullman Palace Car Works, 1893. This picture appeared in a promotional booklet celebrating the paternalistic labor policies of George Pullman. A year later Pullman's workers were at the center of a national strike of rail workers that failed after federal troops intervened.

Date
1893
Subjects
Industry
Pullman Company
Railroads
Working class
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Mittal Steel, Riverdale, Illinois

A modern steel “minimill” about 30 miles south of downtown Chicago. A U.S. flag appears prominently on one side of the mill. Situated on the Calumet River, this facility was built by Acme Steel in 1996 and is the successor to an adjacent mill built in 1918. Through a series of buyouts Acme Steel became part of Mittal Steel, a global steel producer led by Indian-born Lakshmi Mittal. In 2006 Mittal merged with the European steelmaker Arcelor to form the world's largest steelmaker.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Places
Riverdale, Illinois
Ukrainian-Canadian Festival, Saskatoon

A man and woman in traditional dress dance atop a map of Canada. As part of its plan to populate the western provinces the Canadian government encouraged immigration from many European countries. Before World War I cut off trans-Atlantic migration, more than 150,000 Ukrainians had settled in Canada, many of them in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Thousands more arrived in the 1920s. Non-British immigrants often experienced discrimination at the hands of native-born Canadians, and were encouraged to abandon their language and traditional clothes. During World War I, thousands of Ukrainians were imprisoned because they were originally from Canada’s enemy, the Austrian Empire. By the late 1940s, some of the prejudice had tempered as immigrants and their children claimed the right to be Canadians and immigrants.

Creator
Association of Ukrainian Canadians
Date
July 31, 1946
Subjects
Dancers
Immigration
Places
Saskatchewan
Factory worker filing small gun parts, Milwaukee

Photographers working for the U.S. Office of War Information documented the dependence of factories on women workers. In February 1943 this young woman at the Vilter Manufacturing Company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, had one brother in the Coast Guard, and another going into the Army.

Creator
Hollem, Howard R.
Date
1943
Subjects
Gender and society
World War II
Places
Wisconsin