50 results for “Industrial Workers of the World”

Labor rally poster, Du Sable High School

Unionization will advance the cause of all African Americans. So said Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) leader A. Philip Randolph at Du Sable High School in 1937, according to the Pullman Company informant who attended the meeting. Chicago's Pullman Company was a major employer of African Americans and enjoyed a reputation for paternalism toward its workers, providing good wages and an Employee Representation Plan that the company promoted as an alternative to independent unions. Beginning in the mid-1920s the BSCP worked to unionize the porters and maids working in Pullman's sleeping cars. Like other Chicago companies, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management (see image #121).

Date
May 9, 1937
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Labor unions
Pullman Company
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
Is War a Necessary Evil?

During the 1930s the U.S. Department of the Interior funded educational public forums throughout the country, promoting a vision of engaged citizenship during the Great Depression. Half a generation after World War I, Americans viewed developments in European politics with alarm. When a new World War began at the end of the decade, it displaced attention and funds from civic initiatives in adult education.

Creator
U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Education
Date
1938
Subjects
Education
Factory worker filing small gun parts, Milwaukee

Photographers working for the U.S. Office of War Information documented the dependence of factories on women workers. In February 1943 this young woman at the Vilter Manufacturing Company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, had one brother in the Coast Guard, and another going into the Army.

Creator
Hollem, Howard R.
Date
1943
Subjects
Gender and society
World War II
Places
Wisconsin
Pitch In and Help!: Join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps

At harvest time during World War II domestic labor shortages became particularly difficult. U.S. government posters recruited women to join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps to ensure that crops were harvested in time.

Creator
Morley, Hubert
Date
1944
Subjects
Agriculture
Gender and society
World War II
Ukrainian-Canadian Festival, Saskatoon

A man and woman in traditional dress dance atop a map of Canada. As part of its plan to populate the western provinces the Canadian government encouraged immigration from many European countries. Before World War I cut off trans-Atlantic migration, more than 150,000 Ukrainians had settled in Canada, many of them in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Thousands more arrived in the 1920s. Non-British immigrants often experienced discrimination at the hands of native-born Canadians, and were encouraged to abandon their language and traditional clothes. During World War I, thousands of Ukrainians were imprisoned because they were originally from Canada’s enemy, the Austrian Empire. By the late 1940s, some of the prejudice had tempered as immigrants and their children claimed the right to be Canadians and immigrants.

Creator
Association of Ukrainian Canadians
Date
July 31, 1946
Subjects
Dancers
Immigration
Places
Saskatchewan
Railroad employee reading strike news, Burlington, Iowa

Strikes and government intervention were in the headlines in 1948 as American workers and their unions exerted newly won power to win higher wages. Although this photograph was taken as part of an effort to document life and work along the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, it was never published.

Date
1948
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Railroads
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Iowa
Cleaning the Vista Dome Car

A worker empties trash from a rail road dining car, 1949. Two workers are visible inside the car. Most railroad work was racially segregated into the 1950s with African Americans largely restricted to service jobs such as porters, cooks, and cleaners.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Labor
Railroads
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
City of Industry, Hamilton, Ontario, 2007

A steel mill releases smoke and flames into the sky above Hamilton, Ontario. A working class neighborhood is visible in the foreground bordering the industrial plant. Since the late 19th century Hamilton has been one of Canada's major industrial centers and home to an activist labor movement. Despite a shift to service industries, it remains home to Canada's two largest steel mills.

Creator
Walsh, Chris P.
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Places
Canada
Ontario
ADM soybean mill, Decatur, Illinois, April 2007

ADM (formerly Archer Daniels Midland) operates over 200 facilities worldwide that process oilseeds, corn, wheat and cocoa. Founded in Minneapolis in 1902, the company expanded rapidly after World War II. Based in the central Illinois city of Decatur, ADM is one of a handful of global corporations that produce the basic ingredients of modern processed food such as grains, flavors, and protein additives.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Agriculture
Industry
Places
Illinois
Mittal Steel, Riverdale, Illinois

A modern steel “minimill” about 30 miles south of downtown Chicago. A U.S. flag appears prominently on one side of the mill. Situated on the Calumet River, this facility was built by Acme Steel in 1996 and is the successor to an adjacent mill built in 1918. Through a series of buyouts Acme Steel became part of Mittal Steel, a global steel producer led by Indian-born Lakshmi Mittal. In 2006 Mittal merged with the European steelmaker Arcelor to form the world's largest steelmaker.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Places
Riverdale, Illinois