36 results for “Political leaders”

Chicago's Interracial Debating Classic, January 25, 1931

Before the advent of television, lectures and debates provided public entertainment. Social activists used these venues to present their ideas and to educate their constituencies. This flyer promotes a debate involving A. Philip Randolph and Chandler Owen, both leaders of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP), as optimists, and Ben Reitman and David Tullman, both white radicals associated with the Dill Pickle Club, as pessimists. Although the exact topic of the debate is unclear, both sides supported unionization as well as racial integration. In 1931, the BSCP was engaged in a campaign to gain formal recognition as the union of African American porters and maids who worked on Pullman sleeping cars.

Date
1931
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Dill Pickle Club
Education
Labor
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
Reitman, Ben
The Riot at Forty-Ninth Street, 1894

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Scene of Destruction and Pillage in the Panhandle Yards

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
July 8, 1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Underground Routes to Canada

Map showing routes used by African Americans fleeing slavery in the American South to free states in the North and to Canada. Before the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, African Americans who escaped slavery could live and work in relative freedom in northern states, although they usually did not have full political equality. After 1850 many of these Americans moved on to Canada where slavery had been abolished in 1834.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Places
Canada
Enlightened Public Opinion

During the 1930s and 1940s, the federal government sponsored a variety of adult education programs including lectures, study courses, and language instruction. This poster from the U.S. Office of Education promotes the idea that the cultivation of public opinion through these programs would contribute to orderly civic discussion and democratic self-governance. Government-sponsored discussion groups and lectures co-existed with forums organized along political or religious lines.

Creator
U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Education
Date
1938
Subjects
Citizenship
Education
William Jennings Bryan

Born in Illinois, William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) made his political career in Nebraska. Known as the Great Commoner, he ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat for U.S. President three times. As the leader of the Democratic Party between 1896 and 1912 he forged alliances with agrarian Populists and the labor movement. As Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson he resigned to protest what he considered the President's lack of neutrality toward the war in Europe. Later in life Bryan became a vocal critic of the theory of evolution, and an ally of the emerging Christian fundamentalist movement. In 1925 he assisted with the prosecution of Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes, facing off with Chicago lawyer Clarence Darrow.

Date
1909
Subjects
Politics
Religion
People
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925