36 results for “Indian ledger drawings”

Heroism of a Pioneer Woman

A tableau of frontier violence. This image accompanied the tale of a 1791 attack on the John Merrill home in Kentucky in which Mrs. Merrill killed five attackers with her ax. Along with stories of white settlers taken captive by American Indians, images like this portrayed settlers as victims of Indian aggression and celebrated the strength of settler women as a sign of the strength of the young American nation.

Date
1860
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gender and society
Indians of North America
Violence
Places
Mississippi River Valley
West (U.S.)
Custer's Last Battle in New Light

In 1927 William Hale Thompson, the mayor of Chicago, had been elected to a third term after vigorously attacking school history textbooks as too pro-British. He sought to commission the writing of a new textbook that would be more “American.” A delegation of Sioux visited Thompson in December 1927 to make the case that a new textbook should correct misleading accounts of American Indian history, including the battle at Little Big Horn.

Creator
Lorenz, Alma
Date
1927
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Education
Indians of North America
Political campaigns
Visions of history
Places
Chicago
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Front View of the American Fur Company Buildings, Fond du Lac

Thomas McKenney accompanied Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory, to the far west of Lake Superior during the summer of 1826 to meet with American Indian leaders and search for the source of the Mississippi River. This drawing shows the American Fur Trading Company post including a fenced garden area. In his description of the post, McKenney identified separate cemetaries for whites and American Indians behind the garden.

Date
1827
Subjects
Agriculture
American Fur Company
Fur trade
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish), "Custer as a White Man"

Painting on paper by the Native American artist Red Fish. The hand written caption, believed to be by Aaron McGaffey Beede who commissioned the work, reads “Custer as a white man/made by Red Fish/Indians believe Custer/has the “tonj” of an Indian.” The word “tonj” was usually translated as “spirit” in the 19th century, suggesting that Native Americans respected Custer as a fallen warrior. Another image by Red Fish (image #50) shows “Custer as a Comanche.”

Creator
Hogan'-Lu'Ta (Red Fish)
Date
n.d.
Subjects
Art
Indians of North America
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Mittal Steel, Riverdale, Illinois

A modern steel “minimill” about 30 miles south of downtown Chicago. A U.S. flag appears prominently on one side of the mill. Situated on the Calumet River, this facility was built by Acme Steel in 1996 and is the successor to an adjacent mill built in 1918. Through a series of buyouts Acme Steel became part of Mittal Steel, a global steel producer led by Indian-born Lakshmi Mittal. In 2006 Mittal merged with the European steelmaker Arcelor to form the world's largest steelmaker.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Places
Riverdale, Illinois
Seven Days of the Life of a Soldier

Manuscript account by Major Alexander Thompson of a canoe journey from Green Bay to Mackinac Island, between June 1 and June 23, 1831. Accompanied by William Holiday, proprietor of an American Fur Company trading house in the interior, who was returning to headquarters in Mackinac to settle his accounts, and by eight French voyageurs or “pork-eaters,” Thompson left Green Bay on June 1, 1831 in a 30-foot bark canoe owned by the Company. As the travelers made their way around the Bay, he commented on the forests, wildlife, and the customs and legends of the Menomonee, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Winnebago Indians. Weather-bound by strong winds to their camp near Vermilion Island, Thompson hiked along some Indian trails, observing the abundant wild strawberries, roses, peas, grapes, currants, and gooseberries, and moccasin flowers, as well as bear, deer, bald eagle, and sturgeon. Strong winds were a constant hindrance throughout the trip, but finally, at Louse Island, they entered Lake Michigan, paddling at night in the moonlight to take advantage of the calm waters. They arrived at Mackinac Island on June 23rd, and were greeted by Company official Robert Stuart.

Creator
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837
Date
1831
Subjects
American Fur Company
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
Green Bay (Wis.)
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
People
Holiday, William
Thompson, Alexander Ramsay, 1793-1837