125 results for “Chicago (Ill.)”

Portrait of Jack Jones, 1919

A portrait of Jack Jones by Polish immigrant artist Stanislaus Szukalski. A Canadian by birth, and a one-time labor organizer, Jones managed the Dill Pickle Club in Chicago from 1914 to 1931. His friend and collaborator Szukalski, who maintained a studio nearby, was a modernist painter and sculptor and part of the city's bohemian cultural scene. The portrait appeared in an article about Jones by the novelist Sherwood Anderson (image #137).

Creator
Szukalski, Stanislaus
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Immigration
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
The Indians at Argonne fact sheet

In the late spring of 1970, a group of American Indians set up an encampment behind Wrigley Field. Led by Indian activist Mike Chosa, the Chicago Indian Village (CIV) protested against inadequate housing and social services for Chicago's 15,000 American Indians. The following summer, Chosa led a group of fifty men, women, and children in a two-week occupation of an abandoned parcel of government land at Belmont Harbor. Evicted from the site, they took refuge at the Fourth Presbyterian Church. Later in 1971, the CIV occupied government land near Lemont, Illinois. As this CIV flyer illustrates, Chosa used the occupations to generate leverage with government agencies, such as the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO), which he hoped would provide funds for social services.

Date
1971
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Columbia Avenue in Manufactures Building, 1893 World's Fair

A leading photographer of the American West, Jackson made the official set of views for the Exposition.

Creator
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942
Date
1895
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Anarchismus

This book was written by the author while in prison awaiting execution for his participation in the Chicago Haymarket Square riot. Albert Parsons was executed on November 11, 1887. Anarchismus is the German translation of Parsons' work, published by his wife Lucy. Only 300 copies of the English version of the book were circulated, the rest being confiscated by police. The German-language version, however, seems to have circulated freely among Chicago's large German speaking population.

Creator
Parsons, Albert R.
Date
1887
Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Inside cover to _Great Disclosure of Spiritual Wickedness!!_

As a result of disagreements over religion and money, Theophilus Packard committed his wife of twenty-one years, Elizabeth Ware Packard, to the Illinois insane asylum in 1860. Three years later, Elizabeth's son secured her release. Immediately upon her return to their Kankakee home, Theophilus locked her inside and prepared to move her out of the state. Through the help of friends, Elizabeth proved her sanity in court. Abandoned by her husband, Elizabeth moved to Chicago and sold door to door this book recounting her experience. She convinced Illinois to change its commitment process and spent the rest of her life advocating for greater protections for wives from tyrannical husbands.

Creator
Packard, Elizabeth
Date
1865
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Packard, Elizabeth
Letter certifying Christina Olson as Turkish performer at World's Columbian Exposition, 1893

Twelve-year-old Christina Olson performed as a dancer in the Turkish Theater, Midway Plaisance, World's Columbian Exposition, for the summer of 1893. This letter of recommendation, signed by the theater's managers, reads in part, “She has studied the Turkish and Oriental dance and practiced it in the said theater and proved after all to attain a recommendable degree of dance worthy of approval by all the Turks.”

Date
1893
Subjects
Christina Olson
Dance
Theater
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
The Liberty Belle: She's Cracked

A woman dressed in flapper fashion delivers a speech from a soapbox. She points to a sign reading “Liberate the Libido,” a reference to the growing popularity of the work of Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud who argued, in part, that repressed sexual feelings could manifest themselves in antisocial behavior. A handwritten note at the bottom of the cartoon comments: “A typical scene at the Dill Pickle Club.”

Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago Day, 1893 World's Fair

716,881 people attended the World's Columbian Exposition on “Chicago Day,” October 9, 1893.

Creator
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942
Date
1895
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago Magazine, The West As It Is

This magazine cover shows an American Indian watching a locomotive pulling into Chicago as the sun rises over Lake Michigan.

Date
1857
Subjects
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)
Will Amazonic Women Usurp Man's Sphere?

An advertisement for a lecture at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club, printed on the reverse of an advertisement for a lecture by Magnus Hirschfeld. Little is known about the speaker, Elizabeth Davis, who appears to have been part of the bohemian community on Chicago's north side.

Creator
Dill Pickle Club
Date
1931
Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
homosexuality
Places
Chicago (Ill.)