26 results for “Ranch life”

Front cover of program for Buffalo Bill and Captain Jack in _Life on the Border_

A playbill from the five act play entitled, Life on The Border performed at the Dietz Opera House in Oakland, California, on Wednesday, June 13, 1877. Buffalo Bill Cody and Captain Jack Crawford played themselves, dramatizing their western experiences.

Date
1877
Subjects
Theater
Places
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Crawford, Jack, 1847-1917
Photograph of Elizabeth Packard

As a result of disagreements over religion and money, Theophilus Packard committed his wife of twenty-one years, Elizabeth Ware Packard, to the Illinois insane asylum in 1860. Three years later, Elizabeth's son secured her release. Immediately upon her return to their Kankakee home, Theophilus locked her inside and prepared to move her out of the state. Through the help of friends, Elizabeth proved her sanity in court. She convinced Illinois to change its commitment process and spent the rest of her life advocating for greater protections for wives from tyrannical husbands.

Date
1866
Subjects
Gender and society
Places
Illinois
People
Packard, Elizabeth
Inside cover to _Great Disclosure of Spiritual Wickedness!!_

As a result of disagreements over religion and money, Theophilus Packard committed his wife of twenty-one years, Elizabeth Ware Packard, to the Illinois insane asylum in 1860. Three years later, Elizabeth's son secured her release. Immediately upon her return to their Kankakee home, Theophilus locked her inside and prepared to move her out of the state. Through the help of friends, Elizabeth proved her sanity in court. Abandoned by her husband, Elizabeth moved to Chicago and sold door to door this book recounting her experience. She convinced Illinois to change its commitment process and spent the rest of her life advocating for greater protections for wives from tyrannical husbands.

Creator
Packard, Elizabeth
Date
1865
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Packard, Elizabeth
William Jennings Bryan

Born in Illinois, William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) made his political career in Nebraska. Known as the Great Commoner, he ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat for U.S. President three times. As the leader of the Democratic Party between 1896 and 1912 he forged alliances with agrarian Populists and the labor movement. As Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson he resigned to protest what he considered the President's lack of neutrality toward the war in Europe. Later in life Bryan became a vocal critic of the theory of evolution, and an ally of the emerging Christian fundamentalist movement. In 1925 he assisted with the prosecution of Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes, facing off with Chicago lawyer Clarence Darrow.

Date
1909
Subjects
Politics
Religion
People
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925
Step High, Stoop Low, Leave Your Dignity Outside: Entrance to the Dill Pickle Club, 18 Tooker Alley

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, “The Pickle” welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Date
ca. 1920-1930
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Dill Pickle Lending Library

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, 'The Pickle' welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)