50 results for “Industrial Workers of the World”

Is War a Necessary Evil?

During the 1930s the U.S. Department of the Interior funded educational public forums throughout the country, promoting a vision of engaged citizenship during the Great Depression. Half a generation after World War I, Americans viewed developments in European politics with alarm. When a new World War began at the end of the decade, it displaced attention and funds from civic initiatives in adult education.

Creator
U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Education
Date
1938
Subjects
Education
The Garment Workers' Strike

In 1910 and 1915, tens of thousands of Chicago garment workers, many of them young immigrant women, took to the streets to protest their working conditions. Many of the female leaders of the strike were affiliated with the Women's Trade Union League (WTUL), a national organization that sought better conditions for working women through unionization and education.

Date
1915
Subjects
Gender and society
Strikes and lockouts
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
English lessons

Finnish-speaking lumber workers in Duluth, Minnesota, learn English through a class in parliamentary procedure. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries tens of millions of farmers and workers from Europe, Asia, and Latin America moved to North America in search of work. Although anti-immigrant sentiment, and sometimes violence, was common in the U.S. and Canada, governments and private agencies also tried to teach immigrants the culture and language of their adopted land. In some cases, immigrants eagerly participated in these “Americanization” and Canadianization” programs, especially when immigrants considered the programs helpful to their own goals. But in other cases, immigrants rejected and resented forced conformity.

Date
1930s
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Minnesota
J. W. Noseworthy and his class at the Hollinger Mine

A group of immigrant miners learns English in a “Frontier College” classroom. During the early 20th century, Canadian mining, timber, and railroad companies recruited thousands of young men from Europe to work as wage laborers. Living in remote work camps, workers endured difficult conditions and had little contact with mainstream Canadian society. The “Frontier College” was an effort to bring Canadian culture to these workers, teach them English, and discourage radicalism. Young Canadian men, like J.W. Noseworthy pictured here, lived and worked alongside immigrants, and during the evening offered classes and access to reading materials.

Date
1914
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Canada
Ontario
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, February 1916

A worker pauses for his mid-day meal. Gazing beyond an industrial landscape he focuses on a domed building symbolizing the seat of government. Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
Lumber docks, Chicago River

Children watch the photographer as a tugboat pulls a ship through the Chicago River. To the left workers unload lumber from a ship.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Children
Industry
Lumber
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
Pitch In and Help!: Join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps

At harvest time during World War II domestic labor shortages became particularly difficult. U.S. government posters recruited women to join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps to ensure that crops were harvested in time.

Creator
Morley, Hubert
Date
1944
Subjects
Agriculture
Gender and society
World War II
The Liberty Bond Mutual Benefit Association-The Money is Mostly Spent at Home

The U.S. entered Europe's Great War in 1917 as a deeply divided nation. To rally the country to the cause of war, the federal government launched a massive public relations effort drawing on the most talented communicators in business, journalism, and government. In this advertisement from the Chicago Tribune of October 1917, popular cartoonist John T. McCutcheon encourages Americans to support the war effort by purchasing government bonds. With the letters US in the background, a circle of men representing different occupations is united by Liberty Bonds. The poster suggests that only un-American outsiders would refuse to support the bond drive.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1917
Subjects
World War I
Factory worker filing small gun parts, Milwaukee

Photographers working for the U.S. Office of War Information documented the dependence of factories on women workers. In February 1943 this young woman at the Vilter Manufacturing Company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, had one brother in the Coast Guard, and another going into the Army.

Creator
Hollem, Howard R.
Date
1943
Subjects
Gender and society
World War II
Places
Wisconsin
Chicago lakefront, ca. 1893

Along the waterfront are several boat concessions for trips to Lincoln Park and to the Worlds Columbian Exposition in Jackson Park.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1893
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Lake Michigan