125 results for “Chicago (Ill.)”

Labor rally poster, Du Sable High School

Unionization will advance the cause of all African Americans. So said Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) leader A. Philip Randolph at Du Sable High School in 1937, according to the Pullman Company informant who attended the meeting. Chicago's Pullman Company was a major employer of African Americans and enjoyed a reputation for paternalism toward its workers, providing good wages and an Employee Representation Plan that the company promoted as an alternative to independent unions. Beginning in the mid-1920s the BSCP worked to unionize the porters and maids working in Pullman's sleeping cars. Like other Chicago companies, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management (see image #121).

Date
May 9, 1937
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Labor unions
Pullman Company
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
College of Complexes curriculum, 1970

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
1970
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Don't Shop Downtown Until Willis Goes

Chicago activists distributed the “Stop! Don't Shop Downtown” flyer during a campaign to oust Chicago Public Schools superintendent Benjamin Willis. Activists charged Willis with supporting segregated and inadequately funded schools for African Americans. In 1965, over 100,000 Chicago Public School students joined a two-day school boycott to protest the renewal of Willis's contract by the Chicago Board of Education.

Creator
Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Boycotts
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
UPI Press wire demonstration at the _Chicago Sun-Times_ regarding editorial "Now that the March is Over," August 29, 1963

While returning to Chicago by train from the 1963 March on Washington, some civil rights activists read a Sun-Times editorial critical of Martin Luther King, Jr., and other leaders. As this newswire transcript recounts, some 300 activists marched directly from the train station to the Sun-Times building to picket. The newspaper's editors agreed to meet with leaders of the protest.

Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Washington D.C.
People
Black, Timuel
Joe Hill's Funeral

In November 1915, thousands attended the Chicago funeral of songwriter Joe Hill, who was executed by firing squad in a Utah prison. According to his supporters in the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), Hill was falsely convicted of murder. The Swedish immigrant was best known for songs such as The Rebel Girl and The Preacher and the Slave, which gave new political lyrics to popular or traditional tunes.

Date
January 1916
Subjects
Immigration
Industrial Workers of the World
Labor unions
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Hill, Joe
A Tale of Three Actors

Studs Terkel, Oscar Brown, and Fred Pinkard working together in a play protesting the hydrogen bomb. Pinkard work on WMAQ's “Destination Freedom.”

Creator
Morris, Jim
Date
1958
Subjects
Theater
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Advertisement for Buffalo Bill's Wild West

One of many posters advertising William Cody's Wild West Show as a re-enactment of Euro-American conflict with American Indians.

Date
April 27, 1893
Subjects
Advertising
Wild west shows
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Imaginary view of the site of Chicago in 1779

This vision of some of Chicago's earliest residents was the first image in A.T. Andreas' 1886 History of Chicago. The caption notes, the site was then known as “Eschicago” and identifies the building on the north shore of the river as the cabin of Afro-French trader Jean Baptiste Point De Sable. Since the 1600s the area around the mouth of the Chicago River had been a trading ground for various Native American groups, French traders, and their mixed-race descendants.

Creator
Andreas, A. T. (Alfred Theodore), 1839-1900
Date
1884
Subjects
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
College of Complexes curriculum, June 1963

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
June 1963
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
College of Complexes curriculum, November 1960

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
November 1960
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)