Posts Tagged ‘Women’

Low – Symbols of Identity

Please close this window to return to previous page. Our patriarch [was] Leopold Pokagon, who the government named us after, and then we sort of took on that role as Pokagon’s Band of Potawatomi or the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi. We since the 1830s, we’ve always been organized as the Anishinaabek, the human beings that [...]

Making Money

With the arrival of the French, Native people began to produce furs and hides for the international and regional markets. While the creation of social ties rather than the profit motive was initially at the forefront of Indian transactions, they soon became good at trade negotiations, playing the French and English off against one another [...]

Farming

Native peoples grew domesticated plants long before the arrival of Europeans. Corn was introduced as a field crop into the Midwest about 1,200 years ago. Farming also was part of the seasonal round of subsistence activity in the 18th and early 19th centuries. This was largely the work of women, who farmed together as family [...]

Hunting

Providing meat for their families was primarily the job of men, although women sometimes hunted small animals. Hunting methods, based on extensive knowledge of the habits of game animals, included shooting with a bow and arrow or gun and setting various kinds of traps. Hunters had different arrows for different kinds of game: small ones [...]

Fishing

Native people of the Midwest fished the lakes and rivers at least as long ago as 3,000 B. C., using a hook and line, spears, and traps. With time, the technology advanced. For example, harpoons allowed for greater efficiency. Another major technological development about A. D. 1,000 was the gill net, which allowed men to [...]

Wild Rice

Wild rice is a cereal native to North America. It has a greater nutritional value than wheat or oats and was harvested extensively in Wisconsin, Minnesota, parts of Michigan and northern Ohio, Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. Today, the range is more restricted. The plant is a grass that grows in fresh or brachial water from [...]

Gathering

Native people used their extensive knowledge of the forest to obtain food, such as berries, roots, nuts, and leaves for tea. And the sap they obtained from maple trees was made into granulated sugar, syrup, and gum sugar. It was used as a condiment on fish and other foods. How did they obtain maple sugar? [...]

Stereotypes

For centuries, Americans have regarded Native Americans as the “Other,” that is, fundamentally different from themselves. Majority Americans have viewed the Other (“Indians”) as lacking something, either in a good way or a bad way. Such a characterization of Indians is a stereotype. It does not represent the reality of Native American cultures and histories. [...]

Ownership

Native people in the Great Lakes area recognized individually-owned property. Women and men owned their own tools, clothing, ornaments, and any gifts of property they received. Ojibwa husbands and wives owned property separately but lent their possessions to each other. These ideas about gender and property contrasted with those in colonial and early 19th century [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]