Posts Tagged ‘Pipe’

Map 5

Map 1

Sports Imagery

Indian imagery used by athletic teams references both the Noble and Ignoble Indian. Beginning in the early 20th century, high school, college and university, and professional sports teams used “Indian” names, mascots, and logos on everything from clothing to mugs to toilet paper. A national movement led by Indian activists began in 1989, with the [...]

Thomae – Museums and Tribes

Please close this window to return to previous page. In November of 1990, a Congressional law was passed and it’s familiarly called NAGPRA, but it stands for the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. And basically the law states that under certain circumstances tribes can ask for certain items back. There are particular categories [...]

DeMallie – History and Identity

Please close this window to return to previous page. When explorers first came to the Midwest, they were from France, and they met a number of the Dakota people living on the Mississippi River in the area of what is now Minnesota. Their territory stretched from Mille Lacs down the Mississippi and then westward up [...]

NAGPRA

NAGPRA (the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) was passed on November 16, 1990. It defined ownership and provided for the return of Native American (including Hawaiian) human remains and objects from museums. It also established procedures for future acquisitions. Subsequently, human remains and certain objects could be claimed (or repatriated) by lineal descendants [...]

Ownership

Native people in the Great Lakes area recognized individually-owned property. Women and men owned their own tools, clothing, ornaments, and any gifts of property they received. Ojibwa husbands and wives owned property separately but lent their possessions to each other. These ideas about gender and property contrasted with those in colonial and early 19th century [...]

Moundbuilders

Ceremonial centers built by American Indians from about 2,200 to 1,600 years ago existed in what is now Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan, as well as elsewhere. The people who built these centers had previously lived more simply as hunters and fisherman and some had begun to domesticate native plants, such as goosefoot, [...]

Fur Trade

In the early 17th century, French traders began to use Huron (or Wyandot) middlemen to trade with the Native peoples in the Great Lakes region.  Native people belonged to several “ethnic” groups.  The members of an ethnic group (for example Ojibwa or Menominee) spoke the same language and shared a common history and identity, but [...]

American Expansion

After the American Revolution, the U. S. began to sign treaties with Native groups, identified as Tribes, and increasingly tried to take on a dual role of protector and supervisor with sometimes disastrous results. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Indians still lived in villages where several Native groups, European traders, and mixed-ancestry [...]