Posts Tagged ‘Oral history’

Luedtke – Oneida Museum

Please close this window to return to previous page. Welcome to the Oneida Nations Museum. My name is Sara Summers Luedtke and I am the assistant director and collections manager at the museum. We have an exhibit area on the first floor that visitors can go through as well as a gift shop. And outside [...]

Edmunds – Tecumseh

Please close this window to return to previous page. Tecumseh is really interesting in that Tecumseh is one of the few Native American leaders who, even during his time, when he was opposing the United States—and there were military and American politicians opposing him—his opponents really admired him. Tecumseh emerges in the period right after [...]

Tribal Museums

Several tribes in the Midwest operate tribal museums and cultural centers, sometimes in conjunction with tribal libraries. These are community-based and focused centers that are owned and managed by tribes. They have become an integral part of cultural renaissance in Native communities, as well as one of the ways Native communities try to correct misunderstandings [...]

Edmunds – Miami Recognition

Please close this window to return to previous page. There are many tribal communities left here in the Midwest, surprising numbers of tribal communities which are not in fact recognized by the federal government. Many of these people are the descendants of tribal people who remained when tribal, when other parts of the tribe were [...]

Ho-Chunk Mounds

Please close this window to return to previous page. Narrator: The Ho-Chunk, now known as the Winnebago, have recently been making moves to reclaim their heritage along this stretch of the river. Jim Funmaker, Ho-Chunk (Winnebago): This was the traveling place for people that traveled along this Wisconsin River. They camped here and all that. [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]

How We Know

Historians and anthropologists (including archaeologists, ethnographers, and many linguists) have tried to describe and understand continuity and change in Native societies both prior to and after European arrival. In recent years, ethnographers, who conduct research in communities, have tried to explain how present-day innovations are related to long-held Native values and understandings as well as [...]

Indian Perspectives

This site highlights published research by both Native and non-Native scholars. But Native people without academic standing as professional historians also have reflected on and told their own history and they continue to do so in oral history; memoirs; newspaper articles; novels, short stories, plays, and poetry; and more. What do Native people in the [...]