Posts Tagged ‘Legal identity’

Quiz – Treaties Present

Gerzetich – Oneida Enrollment

Please close this window to return to previous page. There’s actually two different kinds of enrollment. There’s tribal enrollment to be a member of the tribe. There’s the federal guidelines which require a person to have ¼ blood quantum. You have to have ¼ Native or Indian blood quantum in order to be an officially [...]

Low – Pokagon Enrollment

Please close this window to return to previous page. Thinking about membership in an American Indian tribe, I get asked this question a lot from students in classes that I teach. Sometimes they think that anybody can become a member, or that you can pay to become a member or that you can volunteer to [...]

Low – Pokagon Claims

Please close this window to return to previous page. The 1895 claim was essentially for annuities and other payments pursuant to land cession treaties that had been completed. In 1833, [and] was the last of the land cession treaties that the Pokagon Potawatomi signed. And there were monies to be paid, other benefits, education and [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]

Legal Identity

Legal identity is established by the federal government and by tribal governments. If the federal government acknowledges that an individual is legally Indian, then that individual is entitled to certain benefits. These benefits follow from the government’s “trustee” responsibility to Indians as established by the Supreme Court. More importantly, Congress recognizes that it owes certain [...]

Sovereignty

By the 1930s, reform groups were criticizing Indian affairs policy by pointing to fiscal mismanagement and social injustice. In 1924, Congress had declared Indians to be citizens of the United States, yet they still were considered wards of the federal government and denied the right to vote in many states. The reform movement laid the [...]