Posts Tagged ‘Kinship’

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Federal and State Recognition

From the time of the establishment of the United States to 1871, the federal government recognized tribes when they signed treaties with them. The U. S. acknowledged that the group that was party to the treaty was a tribe and that the tribe was entitled to protection and support in the form of economic, educational, [...]

Tribal Enrollment

Tribes have the right to determine their own membership. These criteria for enrollment vary from tribe to tribe. In the Midwest, the criteria are based on descendancy, that is, descent from an individual on a particular roll, as well as, in some cases, blood quantum and/or residency of the applicant or his/her parents. Most tribes [...]

DeMallie – Christianity and Identity

Please close this window to return to previous page. In the 1830s, the first resident Christian missionaries arrived among the Dakota. They understood their mission to be one of bringing the word of God to the Dakota people and the question was what was the most effective way of doing it. And as they arrived [...]

DeMallie – Dakota Kinship

Please close this window to return to previous page. For the Dakota people, nothing is more important than kinship. To be a good relative is the most important thing that a Dakota can be. In fact, it is a maxim among the Dakotas that in order to be truly Dakota, one must live up to [...]

Wild Rice

Wild rice is a cereal native to North America. It has a greater nutritional value than wheat or oats and was harvested extensively in Wisconsin, Minnesota, parts of Michigan and northern Ohio, Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. Today, the range is more restricted. The plant is a grass that grows in fresh or brachial water from [...]

Gathering

Native people used their extensive knowledge of the forest to obtain food, such as berries, roots, nuts, and leaves for tea. And the sap they obtained from maple trees was made into granulated sugar, syrup, and gum sugar. It was used as a condiment on fish and other foods. How did they obtain maple sugar? [...]

NAGPRA

NAGPRA (the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) was passed on November 16, 1990. It defined ownership and provided for the return of Native American (including Hawaiian) human remains and objects from museums. It also established procedures for future acquisitions. Subsequently, human remains and certain objects could be claimed (or repatriated) by lineal descendants [...]

Ownership

Native people in the Great Lakes area recognized individually-owned property. Women and men owned their own tools, clothing, ornaments, and any gifts of property they received. Ojibwa husbands and wives owned property separately but lent their possessions to each other. These ideas about gender and property contrasted with those in colonial and early 19th century [...]