Posts Tagged ‘Indian “blood”’

Quiz – How We Know

Map 7

Quiz – Legal Identity

Timeline – Marketplace

Gerzetich – Oneida Enrollment

Please close this window to return to previous page. There’s actually two different kinds of enrollment. There’s tribal enrollment to be a member of the tribe. There’s the federal guidelines which require a person to have ¼ blood quantum. You have to have ¼ Native or Indian blood quantum in order to be an officially [...]

Federal and State Recognition

From the time of the establishment of the United States to 1871, the federal government recognized tribes when they signed treaties with them. The U. S. acknowledged that the group that was party to the treaty was a tribe and that the tribe was entitled to protection and support in the form of economic, educational, [...]

Tribal Enrollment

Tribes have the right to determine their own membership. These criteria for enrollment vary from tribe to tribe. In the Midwest, the criteria are based on descendancy, that is, descent from an individual on a particular roll, as well as, in some cases, blood quantum and/or residency of the applicant or his/her parents. Most tribes [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]

Legal Identity

Legal identity is established by the federal government and by tribal governments. If the federal government acknowledges that an individual is legally Indian, then that individual is entitled to certain benefits. These benefits follow from the government’s “trustee” responsibility to Indians as established by the Supreme Court. More importantly, Congress recognizes that it owes certain [...]

How We Know

To understand the place of Native people in the regional economy today, scholars take a long-term or historical approach. Before the American era, Native people worked for wages and produced goods for the market, playing a vital part in the Great Lakes economy. LISTEN TO HISTORIAN DAVE EDMUNDS DISCUSS POTAWATOMI ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN THE 1840s. Help [...]