Posts Tagged ‘History’

Edmunds – Tecumseh

Please close this window to return to previous page. Tecumseh is really interesting in that Tecumseh is one of the few Native American leaders who, even during his time, when he was opposing the United States—and there were military and American politicians opposing him—his opponents really admired him. Tecumseh emerges in the period right after [...]

Federal and State Recognition

From the time of the establishment of the United States to 1871, the federal government recognized tribes when they signed treaties with them. The U. S. acknowledged that the group that was party to the treaty was a tribe and that the tribe was entitled to protection and support in the form of economic, educational, [...]

Edmunds – Miami Recognition

Please close this window to return to previous page. There are many tribal communities left here in the Midwest, surprising numbers of tribal communities which are not in fact recognized by the federal government. Many of these people are the descendants of tribal people who remained when tribal, when other parts of the tribe were [...]

Low – Pokagon Recognition

Please close this window to return to previous page. The Pokagon Potawatomi Indians, I think, are a typical example of tribes that were historically recognized by the United States government and subsequently disenfranchised and denied their sovereign status. And that can be a very disastrous experience for a community because that tribal identity can be [...]

Edmunds – Treaty Research

Please close this window to return to previous page. The treaties are really interesting in that they are written on two or three levels. And when you initially read through treaties you can say in this treaty an Indian tribe has given up this amount of land and the federal government is going to supply [...]

Edmunds – Potawatomi Entrepreneurship

Please close this window to return to previous page. And I think you can make some very strong cases that in the Midwest there were, for example, the entrepreneurship on the part of the Miami, Potawatomi, some Chippewa, Ottawa people—it’s profound. Their ability as small business people in the late eighteenth century, early nineteenth century—they [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]

Treaties Present

By the late 19th century, Indian political life focused on efforts to get the United States to fulfill treaty promises. Tribes petitioned Congress and the President for investigations of mismanagement of Indian resources and for redress for other treaty violations. Tribes sent delegations of leaders year after year to negotiate and lobby. And, as a [...]

How We Know

To understand the place of Native people in the regional economy today, scholars take a long-term or historical approach. Before the American era, Native people worked for wages and produced goods for the market, playing a vital part in the Great Lakes economy. LISTEN TO HISTORIAN DAVE EDMUNDS DISCUSS POTAWATOMI ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN THE 1840s. Help [...]

How We Know

The courts have relied on the work of scholars in deciding treaty rights cases such as those dealing with hunting and fishing. This is because scholars are trained to research and interpret the historical context in which treaties were negotiated and the perspective of Indian participants in treaty councils. For example, historian Helen Tanner did [...]