Posts Tagged ‘Gathering’

Timeline – Marketplace

Map 5

Tribal Enrollment

Tribes have the right to determine their own membership. These criteria for enrollment vary from tribe to tribe. In the Midwest, the criteria are based on descendancy, that is, descent from an individual on a particular roll, as well as, in some cases, blood quantum and/or residency of the applicant or his/her parents. Most tribes [...]

Dakota Artisans

Please close this window to return to previous page. Robbie Robertson: Trickling back from South Dakota and Nebraska, a handful of families formed the nucleus of the Birch-Cooley settlement at a place they called Cansayapi—“They paint the trees red.” By 1886 there were sixteen teepees and a few small farms near the banks of the [...]

Making Money

With the arrival of the French, Native people began to produce furs and hides for the international and regional markets. While the creation of social ties rather than the profit motive was initially at the forefront of Indian transactions, they soon became good at trade negotiations, playing the French and English off against one another [...]

Gathering

Native people used their extensive knowledge of the forest to obtain food, such as berries, roots, nuts, and leaves for tea. And the sap they obtained from maple trees was made into granulated sugar, syrup, and gum sugar. It was used as a condiment on fish and other foods. How did they obtain maple sugar? [...]

Ownership

Native people in the Great Lakes area recognized individually-owned property. Women and men owned their own tools, clothing, ornaments, and any gifts of property they received. Ojibwa husbands and wives owned property separately but lent their possessions to each other. These ideas about gender and property contrasted with those in colonial and early 19th century [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]

Cultural Identity

In the Great Lakes area, the local groups have shared a regional culture and also developed variations on this culture. The principal theme of regional culture is reciprocity, the belief that it is necessary and morally right to give something to get something in return. This idea has been expressed in the value placed on [...]

Commercial Activity

From the mid-1600s to the early 1800s, Indians sold furs, labor, and goods to European traders throughout the Great Lakes region, while continuing to support their households by hunting, fishing, and gathering. The United States government pressured them to cede their land to settlers moving west. By the 1830s and 1840s, almost all the Indians [...]