Posts Tagged ‘Forestry’

Tribal Museums

Several tribes in the Midwest operate tribal museums and cultural centers, sometimes in conjunction with tribal libraries. These are community-based and focused centers that are owned and managed by tribes. They have become an integral part of cultural renaissance in Native communities, as well as one of the ways Native communities try to correct misunderstandings [...]

Low – Symbols of Identity

Please close this window to return to previous page. Our patriarch [was] Leopold Pokagon, who the government named us after, and then we sort of took on that role as Pokagon’s Band of Potawatomi or the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi. We since the 1830s, we’ve always been organized as the Anishinaabek, the human beings that [...]

Menominee Forestry

Please close this window to return to previous page. Marshall Pecore, Menominee Forest Manager: Menominee history of forest management is a unique blend of people’s conviction and legislation. This long term forest management [on] Menominee seems to demonstrate well here that you can have spiritual rejuvenation, you can have economic base, you can have recreation. [...]

Stripping Bark

Please close this window to return to previous page. Yvonne Walker-Keshick: Usually when we pick the bark, it’s usually a hot, sunny day. The mosquitoes are insane, worse than today. They’re just swarming all over, the mosquitoes are. We need a thunderstorm, a hot, warm day, the strawberries, the wild strawberries got to be ripe, [...]

Tribal Businesses

Tribally-owned businesses became fairly common after the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934. The federal government encouraged, funded, and supervised cooperatives that sold wild rice or beadwork, for example, but these businesses were short-lived. During the War on Poverty in the 1960s and early 1970s, tribes could receive federal funds to establish “industrial parks” with water, [...]

Making Money

With the arrival of the French, Native people began to produce furs and hides for the international and regional markets. While the creation of social ties rather than the profit motive was initially at the forefront of Indian transactions, they soon became good at trade negotiations, playing the French and English off against one another [...]

Wild Rice

Wild rice is a cereal native to North America. It has a greater nutritional value than wheat or oats and was harvested extensively in Wisconsin, Minnesota, parts of Michigan and northern Ohio, Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. Today, the range is more restricted. The plant is a grass that grows in fresh or brachial water from [...]


Native people used their extensive knowledge of the forest to obtain food, such as berries, roots, nuts, and leaves for tea. And the sap they obtained from maple trees was made into granulated sugar, syrup, and gum sugar. It was used as a condiment on fish and other foods. How did they obtain maple sugar? [...]


Native people in the Great Lakes area recognized individually-owned property. Women and men owned their own tools, clothing, ornaments, and any gifts of property they received. Ojibwa husbands and wives owned property separately but lent their possessions to each other. These ideas about gender and property contrasted with those in colonial and early 19th century [...]

Land, Water, and Forest

Throughout the Midwest region is a network of rivers and lakes that provided Native people with rich and varied sources for food, clothing, housing, and tools before and after Europeans arrived. Native people obtained many species of seasonally available fish, as well as an aquatic plant known as wild rice. The waters attracted game and [...]