Posts Tagged ‘Federal recognition’

Low – Pokagon Recognition

Please close this window to return to previous page. The Pokagon Potawatomi Indians, I think, are a typical example of tribes that were historically recognized by the United States government and subsequently disenfranchised and denied their sovereign status. And that can be a very disastrous experience for a community because that tribal identity can be [...]

Low – Casino Opening

Please close this window to return to previous page. Even prior to 1994 and federal recognition we were approached by lobbying groups and other financiers that were interested in funding our efforts in getting federal recognition. The clear objective, I think, was that they were hoping they would have a leg up. Then if we [...]


NAGPRA (the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) was passed on November 16, 1990. It defined ownership and provided for the return of Native American (including Hawaiian) human remains and objects from museums. It also established procedures for future acquisitions. Subsequently, human remains and certain objects could be claimed (or repatriated) by lineal descendants [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]


By the 1930s, reform groups were criticizing Indian affairs policy by pointing to fiscal mismanagement and social injustice. In 1924, Congress had declared Indians to be citizens of the United States, yet they still were considered wards of the federal government and denied the right to vote in many states. The reform movement laid the [...]