Posts Tagged ‘Farming’

Timeline – Marketplace

Map 2

Map 1

Timeline

Ancient Clues

Please close this window to return to previous page. Narrator, Joanne Garrett: The land lives on, ever on. Peoples appear on it briefly, then they are gone. They leave clues leaving us full of guesses. Phil Gardner: After two years of excavation and analysis we know that Native Americans in the Dells were practicing a [...]

Dakota Artisans

Please close this window to return to previous page. Robbie Robertson: Trickling back from South Dakota and Nebraska, a handful of families formed the nucleus of the Birch-Cooley settlement at a place they called Cansayapi—“They paint the trees red.” By 1886 there were sixteen teepees and a few small farms near the banks of the [...]

Tribal Businesses

Tribally-owned businesses became fairly common after the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934. The federal government encouraged, funded, and supervised cooperatives that sold wild rice or beadwork, for example, but these businesses were short-lived. During the War on Poverty in the 1960s and early 1970s, tribes could receive federal funds to establish “industrial parks” with water, [...]

Making Money

With the arrival of the French, Native people began to produce furs and hides for the international and regional markets. While the creation of social ties rather than the profit motive was initially at the forefront of Indian transactions, they soon became good at trade negotiations, playing the French and English off against one another [...]

Farming

Native peoples grew domesticated plants long before the arrival of Europeans. Corn was introduced as a field crop into the Midwest about 1,200 years ago. Farming also was part of the seasonal round of subsistence activity in the 18th and early 19th centuries. This was largely the work of women, who farmed together as family [...]

Stereotypes

For centuries, Americans have regarded Native Americans as the “Other,” that is, fundamentally different from themselves. Majority Americans have viewed the Other (“Indians”) as lacking something, either in a good way or a bad way. Such a characterization of Indians is a stereotype. It does not represent the reality of Native American cultures and histories. [...]