Posts Tagged ‘Ethnography’

DeMallie – Eastman’s Writings

Please close this window to return to previous page. Charles Alexander Eastman was born in 1858 and died in 1939. So his life embraced a very long period of Dakota history. He is for anthropologists, I think, a very important figure because we can learn a great deal from his life and from his writings. [...]

Thomae – Museums and Tribes

Please close this window to return to previous page. In November of 1990, a Congressional law was passed and it’s familiarly called NAGPRA, but it stands for the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. And basically the law states that under certain circumstances tribes can ask for certain items back. There are particular categories [...]

Nesper – The Meaning of Clans

Please close this window to return to previous page. Clanship among Ojibwa is probably, is becoming more important, I think, for people as an aspect of their social identity. I will hear people say things like, “I’m a Crane Clan member. I got my clan from my father.” When it is time for someone to [...]

Nesper – Cultural Change Research

Please close this window to return to previous page. Ojibwa people stipulated for the right to continue to hunt, fish, and gather on their traditional territories when they ceded land to the United States. Those rights were exercised for a period of time in the middle of the 19th century and the State of Wisconsin [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]

How We Know

To understand the place of Native people in the regional economy today, scholars take a long-term or historical approach. Before the American era, Native people worked for wages and produced goods for the market, playing a vital part in the Great Lakes economy. LISTEN TO HISTORIAN DAVE EDMUNDS DISCUSS POTAWATOMI ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN THE 1840s. Help [...]

How We Know

The courts have relied on the work of scholars in deciding treaty rights cases such as those dealing with hunting and fishing. This is because scholars are trained to research and interpret the historical context in which treaties were negotiated and the perspective of Indian participants in treaty councils. For example, historian Helen Tanner did [...]

How We Know

Historians and anthropologists (including archaeologists, ethnographers, and many linguists) have tried to describe and understand continuity and change in Native societies both prior to and after European arrival. In recent years, ethnographers, who conduct research in communities, have tried to explain how present-day innovations are related to long-held Native values and understandings as well as [...]