Posts Tagged ‘Christian missions’

Low – Symbols of Identity

Please close this window to return to previous page. Our patriarch [was] Leopold Pokagon, who the government named us after, and then we sort of took on that role as Pokagon’s Band of Potawatomi or the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi. We since the 1830s, we’ve always been organized as the Anishinaabek, the human beings that [...]

Dakota Artisans

Please close this window to return to previous page. Robbie Robertson: Trickling back from South Dakota and Nebraska, a handful of families formed the nucleus of the Birch-Cooley settlement at a place they called Cansayapi—“They paint the trees red.” By 1886 there were sixteen teepees and a few small farms near the banks of the [...]

Making Money

With the arrival of the French, Native people began to produce furs and hides for the international and regional markets. While the creation of social ties rather than the profit motive was initially at the forefront of Indian transactions, they soon became good at trade negotiations, playing the French and English off against one another [...]

How We Know

Why do non-Indian Americans think about Indians the way they do, and what are the consequences? Scholars have explored these questions by analyzing the images of “Indianness” used by Americans. From colonial times forward, “Indian” figures or characters appeared in visual form–paintings, photographs, cartoons, home furniture and accessories, pageants and public shows, advertisements, film, and [...]

Stereotypes

For centuries, Americans have regarded Native Americans as the “Other,” that is, fundamentally different from themselves. Majority Americans have viewed the Other (“Indians”) as lacking something, either in a good way or a bad way. Such a characterization of Indians is a stereotype. It does not represent the reality of Native American cultures and histories. [...]

Ownership

Native people in the Great Lakes area recognized individually-owned property. Women and men owned their own tools, clothing, ornaments, and any gifts of property they received. Ojibwa husbands and wives owned property separately but lent their possessions to each other. These ideas about gender and property contrasted with those in colonial and early 19th century [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]

Cultural Identity

In the Great Lakes area, the local groups have shared a regional culture and also developed variations on this culture. The principal theme of regional culture is reciprocity, the belief that it is necessary and morally right to give something to get something in return. This idea has been expressed in the value placed on [...]

Treaties Past

The new United States government followed the British tradition in its relations with Indian Nations: treaties with Indians had the same force as with foreign nations and aboriginal title was recognized and land obtained through purchase. The 13 original states that formed a compact in 1781 signed treaties for peace and alliance. In 1789, the [...]

Fur Trade

In the early 17th century, French traders began to use Huron (or Wyandot) middlemen to trade with the Native peoples in the Great Lakes region.  Native people belonged to several “ethnic” groups.  The members of an ethnic group (for example Ojibwa or Menominee) spoke the same language and shared a common history and identity, but [...]