Posts Tagged ‘Burial’

Quiz – How We Know, Part 2

Map 2

Map 1

Timeline

Thomae – Museums and Tribes

Please close this window to return to previous page. In November of 1990, a Congressional law was passed and it’s familiarly called NAGPRA, but it stands for the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. And basically the law states that under certain circumstances tribes can ask for certain items back. There are particular categories [...]

Low – Repatriation

Please close this window to return to previous page. We’ve been working with tribal employees, tribal council, to get the inventories that are required by NAGPRA for museums to provide to us, and to go through those, and to try to get ancestors returned to us when possible. Some of those have been formal repatriations. [...]

Nesper – The Meaning of Clans

Please close this window to return to previous page. Clanship among Ojibwa is probably, is becoming more important, I think, for people as an aspect of their social identity. I will hear people say things like, “I’m a Crane Clan member. I got my clan from my father.” When it is time for someone to [...]

How We Know

Scholars who have addressed the history of the repatriation movement focus on why Americans treated Native remains and objects the way they did. American collecting of these objects, they argue, should be understood as a form of “nation building,” in which Americans came to view the dead bodies of Indians as trophies. In Europe, displaying [...]

NAGPRA

NAGPRA (the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) was passed on November 16, 1990. It defined ownership and provided for the return of Native American (including Hawaiian) human remains and objects from museums. It also established procedures for future acquisitions. Subsequently, human remains and certain objects could be claimed (or repatriated) by lineal descendants [...]

Ownership

Native people in the Great Lakes area recognized individually-owned property. Women and men owned their own tools, clothing, ornaments, and any gifts of property they received. Ojibwa husbands and wives owned property separately but lent their possessions to each other. These ideas about gender and property contrasted with those in colonial and early 19th century [...]