Posts Tagged ‘Anthropology’

DeMallie – Eastman’s Writings

Please close this window to return to previous page. Charles Alexander Eastman was born in 1858 and died in 1939. So his life embraced a very long period of Dakota history. He is for anthropologists, I think, a very important figure because we can learn a great deal from his life and from his writings. [...]

Thomae – Inventories

Please close this window to return to previous page. The inventory was probably the most ambitious aspect of the NAGPRA implementation process. Each museum is different. Our, as I mentioned before, collections are quite large. And so at that point part of our ethnographic collection was inventoried. So that part helped with about 40% of [...]

Federal and State Recognition

From the time of the establishment of the United States to 1871, the federal government recognized tribes when they signed treaties with them. The U. S. acknowledged that the group that was party to the treaty was a tribe and that the tribe was entitled to protection and support in the form of economic, educational, [...]

Nesper – The Meaning of Clans

Please close this window to return to previous page. Clanship among Ojibwa is probably, is becoming more important, I think, for people as an aspect of their social identity. I will hear people say things like, “I’m a Crane Clan member. I got my clan from my father.” When it is time for someone to [...]

Low – Pokagon Recognition

Please close this window to return to previous page. The Pokagon Potawatomi Indians, I think, are a typical example of tribes that were historically recognized by the United States government and subsequently disenfranchised and denied their sovereign status. And that can be a very disastrous experience for a community because that tribal identity can be [...]

Nesper – Cultural Change Research

Please close this window to return to previous page. Ojibwa people stipulated for the right to continue to hunt, fish, and gather on their traditional territories when they ceded land to the United States. Those rights were exercised for a period of time in the middle of the 19th century and the State of Wisconsin [...]

How We Know

Native communities have integrated new technologies, wage work, literacy, Christianity, and other aspects of majority culture into their way of life. At the same time, cultural continuities have persisted for generations. Recent scholarship concentrates on explaining the survival of culturally distinct Indian communities, despite very severe federal assimilation policies directed at American Indians. Anthropologists especially [...]

People, Places & Time

For thousands of years, the Midwest region has been home to indigenous peoples, many of whose descendants belong to Indian “tribes” today. Tribal groups came into being when the U. S. began to negotiate treaties with Native peoples in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Treaties were signed between “sovereign nations,” that is, the United [...]