All 255 items

Nauvoe, Illinois

Mormons fleeing persecution in New York State and then Missouri settled in Nauvoo after 1832, building it up to one of the largest cities in Illinois by the mid-1840s. In 1846 other Illinois residents expelled the Mormons, who headed west for Utah. The Mormon temple on the hill in the distance burned down in 1848. Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a great panoramic painting of the river that was a popular attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published an illustrated account of his travels.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Mormons
Religion
Theater
Places
Illinois
Mississippi River Valley
Anarchismus

This book was written by the author while in prison awaiting execution for his participation in the Chicago Haymarket Square riot. Albert Parsons was executed on November 11, 1887. Anarchismus is the German translation of Parsons' work, published by his wife Lucy. Only 300 copies of the English version of the book were circulated, the rest being confiscated by police. The German-language version, however, seems to have circulated freely among Chicago's large German speaking population.

Creator
Parsons, Albert R.
Date
1887
Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, February 1916

A worker pauses for his mid-day meal. Gazing beyond an industrial landscape he focuses on a domed building symbolizing the seat of government. Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
American Indian Center, 5th Annual American Indian Pow-Wow

Organized in 1953, Chicago's American Indian Center promoted a sense of community among Indians from diverse tribal groups. The annual pow-wow is an opportunity to showcase Indian dancing, music, and the arts and a time for community members to discuss political issues.

Date
1958
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Postcard representing Custer's Last Fight

Postcard depicting Custer's last fight at the Battle of Little Big Horn. The postcard is not addressed nor has it been mailed. This image was distributed as a poster by the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association in 1896.

Date
ca. 1896
Subjects
Advertising
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Places
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
Montana
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Residence of Ira A. Warren, Emmett Township, Calhoun County, Michigan

Ira and Susan Warren resided in Calhoun, County, Michigan, near the city of Battle Creek. They likely paid in advance for a copy of the History of Calhoun County, receiving in exchange a biographic entry and an artist's rendering of their property as a neat and prosperous farm. At the top center of the page is an inset portraying “the old homestead” built four decades earlier.

Creator
Pierce, H. B.
Date
1877
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Log cabins
Places
Michigan
Will Amazonic Women Usurp Man's Sphere?

An advertisement for a lecture at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club, printed on the reverse of an advertisement for a lecture by Magnus Hirschfeld. Little is known about the speaker, Elizabeth Davis, who appears to have been part of the bohemian community on Chicago's north side.

Creator
Dill Pickle Club
Date
1931
Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
homosexuality
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Rollende Prairie

Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the upper Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a panoramic painting nearly half a mile in length, which was a popular theater attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published a book based on his panorama.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Indians of North America
Theater
Places
Great Plains
Mississippi River Valley
Homesteads and Pre-Emptions

During the late 19th century the U.S. government aided settlement of farm farmers on the Great Plains by offering land at very low prices to those who would establish farms. As this description of the process indicates, immigrants seeking homestead land were required to declared their intention to become American citizen. For European immigrants this was a very small barrier.

Date
1872
Subjects
Agriculture
Immigration
Railroads
Places
Great Plains
Kansas
Nebraska
Lumber docks, Chicago River

Children watch the photographer as a tugboat pulls a ship through the Chicago River. To the left workers unload lumber from a ship.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Children
Industry
Lumber
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River