All 255 items

King Debs

In May of 1894, during a severe economic depression, members of the newly formed American Railway Union went on strike to protest the Pullman Company's refusal to reduce rental rates in company housing to match wage cuts. The union, led by Eugene V. Debs, called for a nationwide boycott on handling and repairing Pullman sleeping cars. Business and government leaders felt that a national railroad strike was tantamount to insurrection because it disrupted trade and mail delivery. Federal troops entered Chicago in July to end the strike.

Creator
Rogers, W. A.
Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
People
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926
Emancipation Parade in Windsor, Ontario

In the 1930s residents of Windsor, Ontario, began celebrating Britain's 1833 Emancipation Act, which officially banned slavery in Canada and other parts of the British Empire.

Date
1952
Subjects
Emancipation
Places
Canada
Ontario
Attention Workingmen! Achtung Arbeiter!

This bilingual broadside advertised a meeting in Chicago's Haymarket Square in 1886. An explosion near the end of the rally resulted in at least eleven deaths and dozens of injuries. Though the person responsible for the bombing was never known, eight anarchists were arrested and put on trial. The purpose of the meeting was to protest a conflict at the McCormick Reaper Works a day earlier in which police shot and killed six workers.

Date
1886
Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Immigration
Working class
Is War a Necessary Evil?

During the 1930s the U.S. Department of the Interior funded educational public forums throughout the country, promoting a vision of engaged citizenship during the Great Depression. Half a generation after World War I, Americans viewed developments in European politics with alarm. When a new World War began at the end of the decade, it displaced attention and funds from civic initiatives in adult education.

Creator
U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Education
Date
1938
Subjects
Education
American Agriculturist, 1883-84

An illustrated cover of the farm journal American Agriculturalist depicts the development of farming technologies from antiquity to the 19th century.

Date
1883
Subjects
Agriculture
Visions of history
United States of America Compiled from the latest & best Authorities

Like other maps from the early years of the United States, John Melish's 1818 map claimed territory for the new nation. The odd shape of the state of Illinois suggests the mapmaker's limited knowledge of the region, perhaps due to the fact that most American settlement at the time was closer to the Ohio River. The map includes references to American Indian settlements to the west of the Mississippi River.

Creator
Melish, John, 1771-1822
Date
1818
Subjects
Mapping
Places
North America
ADM soybean mill, Decatur, Illinois, April 2007

ADM (formerly Archer Daniels Midland) operates over 200 facilities worldwide that process oilseeds, corn, wheat and cocoa. Founded in Minneapolis in 1902, the company expanded rapidly after World War II. Based in the central Illinois city of Decatur, ADM is one of a handful of global corporations that produce the basic ingredients of modern processed food such as grains, flavors, and protein additives.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Agriculture
Industry
Places
Illinois
English lessons

Finnish-speaking lumber workers in Duluth, Minnesota, learn English through a class in parliamentary procedure. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries tens of millions of farmers and workers from Europe, Asia, and Latin America moved to North America in search of work. Although anti-immigrant sentiment, and sometimes violence, was common in the U.S. and Canada, governments and private agencies also tried to teach immigrants the culture and language of their adopted land. In some cases, immigrants eagerly participated in these “Americanization” and Canadianization” programs, especially when immigrants considered the programs helpful to their own goals. But in other cases, immigrants rejected and resented forced conformity.

Date
1930s
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Minnesota
Annie Oakley

The sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926) was born Phoebe Ann Moses to a poor Ohio farming family. To feed and support her family she learned to trap and shoot, and later performed shooting tricks on stage. She became a regular part of William Cody's Wild West Show in 1885. This portrait from 1899 suggests how Oakley stretched the conventional roles for women in the late 19th century as an expert shooter, although she always wore a skirt and rode sidesaddle in deference to audiences expectations.

Creator
Fox, Richard, K.
Date
1899
Subjects
Gender and society
Theater
Wild West Show
Types and Development of Man

An illustration from the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, conveys the racialist thinking common at the time.

Creator
Buel, James W., 1849-1920
Date
1904
Subjects
World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904