All 255 items

Wild Rivalries of Savage, Barbarous and Civilized Races

Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West show highlighted the horse-riding traditions of many countries, while always depicting white Americans as the most advanced. The three-way division of races between “savage” (Indians), “barbarous” (non-Christian), and “civilized” (white Europeans) was a common feature of racialist thinking at the turn of the 20th century.

Creator
Courier Litho. Co.
Date
c . 1896
Subjects
Race
Wild west shows
Color satellite photo of the Great Lakes

In satellite imagery, the Great Lakes dominate the landscape of central North America, uninterrupted by the political boundaries between the U.S. and Canada, or between states and provinces.

Creator
Leshkevich, G.
Date
1995
Subjects
Great Lakes Region
Mapping
Places
Great Lakes
Woman's Protest Against Woman Suffrage

Chicago novelist Caroline F. Corbin considered socialism and women's suffrage closely allied evils. Together, she believed, the two would undermine the traditional family and ultimately harm women. In 1897, Corbin formed the Illinois Association Opposed to the Extension of Suffrage to Women (IAOESW). In this tract, IAOESW argues that imposing the obligations of suffrage upon women will undermine their ability to fulfill their civic responsibilities as mothers and wives. Instead, it argues that women are fully represented by the votes of their husbands, brothers, and sons.

Creator
Illinois Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage
Date
1909
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Suffrage
Ukrainian-Canadian Festival, Saskatoon

A man and woman in traditional dress dance atop a map of Canada. As part of its plan to populate the western provinces the Canadian government encouraged immigration from many European countries. Before World War I cut off trans-Atlantic migration, more than 150,000 Ukrainians had settled in Canada, many of them in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Thousands more arrived in the 1920s. Non-British immigrants often experienced discrimination at the hands of native-born Canadians, and were encouraged to abandon their language and traditional clothes. During World War I, thousands of Ukrainians were imprisoned because they were originally from Canada’s enemy, the Austrian Empire. By the late 1940s, some of the prejudice had tempered as immigrants and their children claimed the right to be Canadians and immigrants.

Creator
Association of Ukrainian Canadians
Date
July 31, 1946
Subjects
Dancers
Immigration
Places
Saskatchewan
Canadiska Västern: den Sista Bästa Västern

A young man wipes his brow as if resting from hard work. In the background, symbols of agriculture and industry stretch out toward a distant mountain range. During the early 20th century, the government of Canada advertised in many countries of Europe hoping to recruit settlers to farm the prairie provinces, and work in its growing industries. The recruitment campaign helped to bring over 1.5 million immigrants to Canada during the first decade of the century.

Creator
Canada. Department of Interior.
Date
1910
Subjects
Agriculture
Immigration
Places
Canada
J. W. Noseworthy and his class at the Hollinger Mine

A group of immigrant miners learns English in a “Frontier College” classroom. During the early 20th century, Canadian mining, timber, and railroad companies recruited thousands of young men from Europe to work as wage laborers. Living in remote work camps, workers endured difficult conditions and had little contact with mainstream Canadian society. The “Frontier College” was an effort to bring Canadian culture to these workers, teach them English, and discourage radicalism. Young Canadian men, like J.W. Noseworthy pictured here, lived and worked alongside immigrants, and during the evening offered classes and access to reading materials.

Date
1914
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Canada
Ontario
Haymarket monument, Chicago

In 2004 the city of Chicago dedicated a monument to commemorate the anarchist labor leaders arrested in the wake of a bomb explosion in Haymarket Square on May 4, 1886. Behind the monument a giant advertisement for a luxury SUV covers the entire wall of a building.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2004
Subjects
Advertising
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Labor
World Fashions Make Aurora a Style Center

In the 1920s and 1930s, the International Corset Company of Aurora, Illinois was a major manufacturer of foundation garments. During the 1920s it sponsored the International School of Scientific Corsetry to provide training to corset salespeople. For the Aurora centennial in 1937, the company boasted that its international reputation put Aurora on the map of world fashion.

Creator
Zak, Karel J.
Date
1937
Subjects
Advertising
Gender and society
Industry
Tens-Kwau-Ta-Waw, the Prophet

Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, led a major religious movement among Indians in the Midwest between 1805 and 1813. His brother Tecumseh led a parallel political effort to unify Indians in resistance to the encroachment of white settlement.

Creator
Inman, Henry, 1801-1846
King, Charles Bird, 1785-1862
Date
1848
Subjects
Indians of North America
Religion
Sharecropper, cover of _New Anvil,_ May-June 1940

Jack Conroy, a worker and proletarian writer born in a coal mining camp in Missouri, moved to Chicago in 1938, where he worked on the Illinois Writers Project and edited the New Anvil, a small literary magazine, with Nelson Algren.

Creator
de Graff, Stanley
Date
1940
Subjects
Literature
Working class
People
Conroy, Jack