All 255 items

A Squad of Genuine Cuban Insurgents

When the United States declared war on Spain in 1898 it was in part to support the independence movement in Cuba. For William Cody, the good-versus-evil struggle in Cuba mirrored the dramas of western combat he regularly presented in his Wild West Shows.

Creator
Courier Litho. Co., Buffalo, N.Y.
Date
1898
Subjects
Empire
Wild west shows
Gilpin's Hydrographic Map of North America

William Gilpin moved west from Philadelphia in the 1830s, and became an indefatigable promoter of the West as a lecturer, writer, and as editor of the Missouri Daily Argus. He saw America as destined to become the center of the next great phase of civilization, and saw the Mississippi Valley as the heart of that civilization. Gilpin's 1848 hydrographic map enlarged the Mississippi basin and pushed the Rocky Mountains west of their actual position. In 1861 he became the first governor of the Colorado Territory.

Creator
Gilpin, William, 1813-1894
Date
1848
Pitch In and Help!: Join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps

At harvest time during World War II domestic labor shortages became particularly difficult. U.S. government posters recruited women to join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps to ensure that crops were harvested in time.

Creator
Morley, Hubert
Date
1944
Subjects
Agriculture
Gender and society
World War II
Enlightened Public Opinion

During the 1930s and 1940s, the federal government sponsored a variety of adult education programs including lectures, study courses, and language instruction. This poster from the U.S. Office of Education promotes the idea that the cultivation of public opinion through these programs would contribute to orderly civic discussion and democratic self-governance. Government-sponsored discussion groups and lectures co-existed with forums organized along political or religious lines.

Creator
U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Education
Date
1938
Subjects
Citizenship
Education
Towards the Dawn!

A family walks an uphill road toward a rising sun symbolizing the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  The Great Depression of the 1930s hit farmers and rural communities particularly hard.  Across the Great Plains rural people supported a variety of political movements that sought greater involvement of national governments in the management of the economy.  In 1932 several Canadian farmer, labor, and socialist groups came together to form a political party known as the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  Influenced by socialist and agrarian reform movements in Europe and North America, he goal of the CCF was an economic system “in which the principle regulating production, distribution and exchange will be the supplying of human needs and not the making of profits,” according an early manifesto.  The CCF moderated some of its more radical positions, but remained a self-described “socialist” party when it won a majority of the seats in the Saskatchewan provincial assembly in 1944.  The CCF maintained its political leadership in province for 20 years enacting important social legislation effecting health care, education, and rural electrification. In the 1960s, the CCF merged with other groups to become the New Democratic Party.

Creator
Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation
Date
ca. 1930s
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Socialism
Working class
Places
Saskatchewan
Carte copiée sur celle qui a été tracée par le sauvage Ochagache et autres

The map shown here was traced in a French archive in 1846 from an original map drawn in the 1730s by Auchagah (Ochagache), a Cree Indian, at the request of a French army officer stationed at a fort north of Lake Superior. Auchagah based his map on earlier maps and drawings made by other Cree Indians, as well as his own knowledge of the area.

Creator
Margry. Pierre
Date
1846, 1730s
Subjects
Cree Indians
Mapping
Beaver

This drawing depicts a beaver and a scene showing Native Americans capturing and drying the meat of wild “Beeves” (long horned beef cattle). Lahontan had visited New France with the French colonial army in the late 1780s, and his account of his travels helped shaped European perceptions of North America.

Creator
Lahontan, Louis Armand de Lom d'Arce, baron de
Date
1703
Le Cours du Missisipi

Nicholas De Fer, geographer to the king of France, prepared this map for the Compagnie d'Occident (Company of the West) to promote the development of a French colony in the Mississippi Valley.

Creator
Fer, Nicolas de, 1646-1720
Date
1718
Places
Mississippi River Valley
Death of Custer

Decades after Custer's death, Pawnee Bill (Gordon W. Lillie), like Buffalo Bill, found commercial success in reenacting a stylized vision of frontier victimization.

Creator
Siegel, Cooper & Co.
Date
c. 1905
Subjects
Indians of North America
Theater
Visions of history
People
Pawnee Bill, 1860-1942
Farm scene near Scotts Bluff, Nebraska

A farmer riding a tractor tills a field in western Nebraska. Small gasoline powered tractors like this one transformed farm work during the middle of the 20th century.

Creator
Bubley, Esther
Date
1948
Subjects
Agriculture
Places
Nebraska