All 255 items

Chief American Horse, Northern Cheyenne

Oil on canvas. Signed “E.A. Burbank, Lame Deer, Mont., 1897.”

Creator
Burbank, E. A. (Elbridge Ayer), 1858-1949
Date
1897
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Places
Montana
People
American Horse, Dakota Chief, 1840-1908
Step High, Stoop Low, Leave Your Dignity Outside: Entrance to the Dill Pickle Club, 18 Tooker Alley

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, “The Pickle” welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Date
ca. 1920-1930
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
The March of Destiny

The scene depicts “Pioneer Heroes” in a caravan heading westward. An inset in the upper left portrays migrants crossing the Appalachian mountains in Kentucky, while an inset in the bottom right corner dramatizes the search for gold in California.

Date
1883
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gold Rush
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
California
Kentucky
Dill Pickle Tea Room

This advertisement from the Dill Pickle Club suggests some of the appeal of bohemian night spots: conversation, special parties, and “atmosphere.”

Date
ca. 1928
Subjects
Advertising
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Frontispiece to _The Poet Scout: A Book of Song and Story_

Jack W. Crawford (1847-1917), known as “Captain Jack, the Poet Scout,” published his first book of poetry in 1879, republished in subsequent editions. Crawford's poetry recounts tales of his adventures in the west.

Creator
Crawford, Jack, 1847-1917
Date
1886
Subjects
Poetry
Places
West (U.S.)
People
Crawford, Jack, 1847-1917
Terrorism

In coordinated raids organized by Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer across the nation during January 1920, federal and local law enforcement officials arrested thousands of radicals, trade union militants, and immigrants. Officials warned that this breach of civil liberties was necessary because radicals were plotting to overthrow the government. In response, the Chicago Federation of Labor's newspaper attacked Palmer's Red Raids as employer-inspired retribution for the massive strikes that had paralyzed industry during 1919.

Creator
Chicago Federation of Labor
Date
January 10, 1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Labor
Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island

Seth Eastman produced watercolor drawings to illustrate Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Condition and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States (Philadelphia : Lippincott, Grambo & Company, (successors to Grigg, Elliot & Co.), 1853).

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Fort Mackinac (Mackinac Island, Mich.)
People
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864
Sherwood Anderson, "Jack Jones--The Pickler."

In this article from the Chicago Daily News, the novelist Sherwood Anderson describes the diverse audience at the Dill Pickle Club: “The street car conductor sits on a bench beside the college professor, the literary critic, the earnest young wife, who hungers for culture, and the hobo.”

Creator
Sherwood Anderson
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Bridge building in Illinois

With the help of a steam-powered crane, workers place a massive steel beam into a railroad bridge. Steel and concrete bridges allowed for heavier trains and were more durable than the wood and stone bridges they replaced.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Bridges
Railroads
Workers
Places
Illinois
Section of Du Pratz's Map of Louisiana, 1757

The 1757 book A History of Louisiana by Antoine Le Page Du Pratz was among the few books carried with the Lewis & Clark expedition across the North American continent. Du Pratz had lived in present-day Louisiana and Mississippi in the early 1700s and his book described geographic and natural features of the region, including second hand accounts of travels deep into the Great Plains. This section of Du Pratz's map of central North America appeared in a history of Chicago from the 1880s.

Date
1886
Subjects
Mapping
Places
Louisiana
Mississippi River Valley