All 255 items

Chicago in 1832

This image was published in 1893 when Chicago had a population of more than a million people. A caption at the bottom reads: “This drawing taken by George Davis, a well known resident of Chicago, is a faithful landscape of the locality at the junction of the two branches of the Chicago River, then called Wolf's Point. The building on the left was a Tavern kept by Elijah Wentworth, where Gen. Scott made his headquarters during the Black Hawk War. That on the right was the Miller House. Each of them being used, as necessities might require, for Sunday Services, School Houses, Taverns and private residences. Except the Fort, they were the two most notable buildings of the place.”

Creator
Davis, George
Date
ca. 1893
Subjects
Visions of history
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Scott Rader Farm near Knoxville, Illinois

Scott Rader's four children walk behind a small herd of cattle.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Children
Farming
Places
Illinois
Boy separating cream at the Rader Farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Children of farm families were expected to help out with farm work from a young age. Here one of the sons of the farmer Scott Rader uses a machine to separate cream from raw milk. Behind him sits a Maytag clothes washing machine. As more farm homes gained access to electricity over the mid-twentieth century, domestic machinery transformed the work of maintaining a farm household.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois
Lumber on the docks, Chicago

A view of Chicago's lakefront lumber docks. Ships arrived here from ports in the upper Great Lakes and transferred their cargo to waiting rail cars. The lumber appears to be telegraph poles.

Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Industry
Lumber
Railroads
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Lake Michigan
Fur trade contract, 1692

Fur trade contract, dated Sept. 15, 1692 in Ville-Marie, Québec, concerning transport of merchandise to Michilimackinac and Chicago to be traded for beaver pelts. The contract describes an agreement between François Francoeur dit Lavalle—represented here by his wife Marie Magdeleine St.-Jean, authorized by him to conduct their joint business affairs while he was away “aux Illinois”—and four voyageurs: Simon Guillory, Jean Baptiste Jarry, Louis Roy, and by proxy, Simon Roy. For 500 livres each in beaver pelts, and their food, the voyageurs agreed to make the journey to Michilimackinac and “Chicagou” (one of the earliest references to Chicago in a voyageur contract) the following spring, in two canoes to be furnished by them, to transport merchandise, and to make the return with beaver pelts. At each of the trading centers, the four voyageurs have permission to use one of the canoes to trade 300 livres of merchandise each for personal profit. There are also provisions concerning voyageurs “hyvernants,” those who spend the winter out in trapping country in Illinois. The contract includes Francoeur's footnotes in margins, marked in the text with a sequence of carats and circles. Each addition is initialed by two or three of the parties involved, and the document is signed by St.-Jean and Guillory; the notary, Maugue; and witnesses Jean Legras and Adrien Betouni. Jarry and Roy did not sign, as they did not know how to write their names.

Creator
Francoeur, François
Guillory, Simon
Jarry, Jean Baptiste
Roy, Louis
Roy, Simon
St.-Jean, Marie Magdeleine
Date
1692
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
French Canada
Great Lakes
Québec
People
Francoeur dit Lavalle, François
Front cover of program for Buffalo Bill and Captain Jack in _Life on the Border_

A playbill from the five act play entitled, Life on The Border performed at the Dietz Opera House in Oakland, California, on Wednesday, June 13, 1877. Buffalo Bill Cody and Captain Jack Crawford played themselves, dramatizing their western experiences.

Date
1877
Subjects
Theater
Places
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Crawford, Jack, 1847-1917
Photograph of Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill

A photograph of Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill as they appeared in the Wild West Show while in Montreal, Canada. In the 1870s, Sitting Bull led Sioux resistance to Euro-American settlement on the northern Great Plains, most notably defeating the U.S. Army at the Battle of Little Big Horn. After the defeat of the Sioux, Sitting Bull was confined to his reservation home except for his brief tour with William Cody's Wild West Shows in which he played himself.

Creator
Notman, William
Date
ca. 1885
Subjects
Indians of North America
Theater
Wild West Shows
Places
Montréal, Quebec
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917
Sitting Bull, 1834?-1890
There Ought to Be School for the Instruction of Women Voters

This cartoon appeared in the Chicago Tribune five days after the Illinois House of Representatives approved women's suffrage in Illinois.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1913
Subjects
Education
Gender and society
Suffrage
Places
Illinois
View of Burlington

A view from the south of the town of Burlington, Iowa. Paddle wheel boats navigate the Mississippi River while others dock at the shore. In the foreground a locomotive crosses the iron bridge spanning the river. Steeples of the town's many churches are visible along the skyline. Printed in the guidebook “How to Go West,” the image suggests opportunities for work, trade, and community for those moving west.

Date
1872
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Mississippi River
Custer's Last Rally

In the preface to the book, the author, T. M. Newson, claims, “Most scenes described, and nearly all the incidents narrated, in the pages of this book, were part of my own personal experience of a residence of some thirty years on the frontier, and for which I can vouch as true, except, perhaps, the incidents of the last great battle of the lamented Custer with Sitting Bull, and for these I am indebted to one who was early on the ground after the conflict, and who has obtained from the Indians themselves what I deem to be a very accurate picture of the terrible struggle between contending forces.”

Date
1884
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Indians of North America
Places
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Sitting Bull, 1834?-1890