All 255 items

A Night in Bohemia: Dill Pickle Masked Ball

Among the most popular Dill Pickle Club events were its frequent masquerade balls. These events appealed to a broad range of partygoers, allowing wealthy residents of the Gold Coast to mingle in relative anonymity with working people and artists. Masquerade balls also attracted gay men and women. Under cover of the party, women could dress as men and men as women. With so many people cross-dressing, few took notice of same sex couples. Although the Dill Pickle Club closed early in the 1930s, citywide Halloween Balls continued to be meeting places for gay men and women into the 1940s.

Date
1916
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Oak Park Farm

In the late 19th century prosperous farmers like Henry Coppock of Johnson County in eastern Kansas often paid to have elaborate engravings of their properties placed in county atlases. In this case, a map of the property with images of crops and animals accompanies the image the farm buildings and grounds. The map indicates that Coppock's farm was on two major roads and a rail line that linked him to the nearby urban hub of Kansas City.

Creator
Heisler, E. F.
Smith, D. M.
Date
1874
Subjects
Agriculture
Mapping
Transportation
Places
Kansas
Cover to _What Every Girl Should Know_

The pamphlet What Every Girl Should Know is a compilation of Sanger's early articles on birth control. Sanger had been prosecuted for transmitting “obscene” materials through the mail. By the 1920s, the federal government loosened its enforcement on mailing birth control information, although the obscenity laws were not formally overturned until the 1960s.

Creator
Sanger, Margaret
Date
1922
Subjects
Gender and society
Law
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, November 1915

Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Labor unions
Socialism
Strikes
Working class
Items for Passengers Going Across the Continent

A page from the guidebook “How to Go West” details the prices for passengers and freight traveling across North America in the early 1870s. Sleeping cars were reserved for 1st class passengers only. Second class and emigrant class passengers rode in less elegant accommodations and were advised to bring “a lunch basket” for a trip lasting several days from Omaha to San Francisco.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Pullman cars
Railroads
Tourism
Log Cabin meeting houses

This lithograph shows the succession of buildings that served Presbyterians in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Creator
P.S. Deuval and Co.
Date
1854
Subjects
Log cabins
Visions of history
Places
Pennsylvania
Joe Hill's Funeral

In November 1915, thousands attended the Chicago funeral of songwriter Joe Hill, who was executed by firing squad in a Utah prison. According to his supporters in the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), Hill was falsely convicted of murder. The Swedish immigrant was best known for songs such as The Rebel Girl and The Preacher and the Slave, which gave new political lyrics to popular or traditional tunes.

Date
January 1916
Subjects
Immigration
Industrial Workers of the World
Labor unions
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Hill, Joe
The Garment Workers' Strike

In 1910 and 1915, tens of thousands of Chicago garment workers, many of them young immigrant women, took to the streets to protest their working conditions. Many of the female leaders of the strike were affiliated with the Women's Trade Union League (WTUL), a national organization that sought better conditions for working women through unionization and education.

Date
1915
Subjects
Gender and society
Strikes and lockouts
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Labor rally poster, Du Sable High School

Unionization will advance the cause of all African Americans. So said Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) leader A. Philip Randolph at Du Sable High School in 1937, according to the Pullman Company informant who attended the meeting. Chicago's Pullman Company was a major employer of African Americans and enjoyed a reputation for paternalism toward its workers, providing good wages and an Employee Representation Plan that the company promoted as an alternative to independent unions. Beginning in the mid-1920s the BSCP worked to unionize the porters and maids working in Pullman's sleeping cars. Like other Chicago companies, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management (see image #121).

Date
May 9, 1937
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Labor unions
Pullman Company
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
Cheyenne camp attacked at Powder River

From a Cheyenne ledger book, probably illustrated between 1877 and 1879, containing drawings by Black Horse and other Cheyenne warriors. The Black Horse ledger book is part of a long tradition of the Plains Indians of chronicling their lives pictorially, first on buffalo hides, and later on the blank pages of ledger books obtained from U.S. soldiers, traders, missionaries, and reservation employees.

Date
ca. 1876
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Horsemanship
Indian ledger drawings
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
People
Black Horse (Cheyenne)