All 255 items

The Falls of St. Anthony

Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the upper Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a panoramic painting nearly half a mile in length, which was a popular theater attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published a book based on his panorama. He began at the Falls of St. Anthony in Minnesota, which became the site of Minneapolis.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Indians of North America
Theater
Places
Minnesota
Mississippi River Valley
Theodore Roosevelt to Edith Wyatt

Despite mixed feelings, Theodore Roosevelt officially supported women's suffrage in his 1912 presidential campaign. His discomfort with the subject is evident in a letter he wrote in reply to Chicago literary critic Edith Franklin Wyatt. Roosevelt suggests that women's suffrage might help in the fight against prostitution. He also expresses doubts about the positive effects of women's votes, however, noting that there has been little change in states that have granted them suffrage.

Creator
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Date
December 15, 1912
Subjects
Gender and society
Suffrage
People
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Ticket to "Ladies Night: An Evening with Brother Capt. Jack Crawford"

On the back of the ticket was printed a poem by Capt. Jack Crawford, 'Sunshine Boomerang.' The New York Lyceum Bureau promoted Capt. Jack Crawford as a speaker in 1910 with a testimonial from Senator Robert LaFollette, who wrote: “Capt. Jack Crawford is one of the most pleasing lecturers, the most unique and magnetic of the personalities on the lyceum platform today. His quaint philosophy, the sunshine and pathos of his poetry and stories, and the broad patriotism of his lectures make an irresistible appeal.”

Date
1910
Subjects
Advertising
Amusements
People
Crawford, Jack, 1847-1917
Chicago Under the Mob

When Frederic Remington wrote and illustrated this article about labor unrest in Chicago he was already a well-known for his images of western themes. The text describes Chicago's immigrant workers as an uncivilized and violent mob. The troops sent to restore order, Remington points out, had recently participated in the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1895
Subjects
Labor
Pullman Company
Pullman Strike, 1894
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Cover of _Western Life and How I Became a Bronco Buster_

The book details the author's experiences as he traveled from Liverpool, England, to California to become a bronco buster.

Creator
Quickfall, Bob Grantham
Date
1891
Subjects
Cowboys
Ranch life
Places
West (U.S.)
Chicago Indian Village

In the late spring of 1970, a group of American Indians set up an encampment behind Wrigley Field. Led by Indian activist Mike Chosa, the Chicago Indian Village (CIV) protested against inadequate housing and social services for Chicago's 15,000 American Indians. The following summer, Chosa led a group of fifty men, women, and children in a two-week occupation of an abandoned parcel of government land at Belmont Harbor. Evicted from the site, they took refuge at the Fourth Presbyterian Church. Later in 1971, the CIV occupied government land near Lemont, Illinois. As this CIV flyer illustrates, Chosa used the occupations to generate leverage with government agencies that he hoped would provide funds for social services.

Date
ca. 1970
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Industry along the Chicago River and Lake Michigan

A view of the lumber docks and rail yard at the mouth of the Chicago River. The city's skyline is visible in the distance, partially obscured by smoke.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Industry
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
Lake Michigan
Photograph of Elizabeth Packard

As a result of disagreements over religion and money, Theophilus Packard committed his wife of twenty-one years, Elizabeth Ware Packard, to the Illinois insane asylum in 1860. Three years later, Elizabeth's son secured her release. Immediately upon her return to their Kankakee home, Theophilus locked her inside and prepared to move her out of the state. Through the help of friends, Elizabeth proved her sanity in court. She convinced Illinois to change its commitment process and spent the rest of her life advocating for greater protections for wives from tyrannical husbands.

Date
1866
Subjects
Gender and society
Places
Illinois
People
Packard, Elizabeth
An Improved Edition of a Map of the Surveyed Part of the Territory of Michigan

John Farmer became the premier cartographer of Michigan in the early nineteenth century, publishing his first map of the state in 1826. In this map that Farmer published in English in 1835, he neglects Indian villages, unlike the 1834 version published in German, and also shows that an increasing part of the state has been covered by the rectangular land survey.

Creator
Farmer, John, 1798-1859
Date
1835?
Subjects
Mapping
Places
Mackinac Island (Mich.)
Michigan
Manufactures Building from Horticultural Hall, 1893 World's Fair

A leading photographer of the American West, Jackson made the official set of views for the Exposition.

Creator
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942
Date
1895
Subjects
Industry
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)