13 results for “ca. 1890”

Mexican Vaquero

Dodge wrote, “The American cowboy has a Mexican cousin, the vaquero, who does cow-punching in Chihuahua, and raises horses for the Mexican cavalry and occasional shipment across the Rio Grande. The vaquero is generally a peon, and as lazy, shiftless, and unreliable vagabond as men held to involuntary servitude are wont to be. He is essentially a low-down fellow in his habitats and instincts. Anything is grub to him which is not poison, and he will thrive on offal which no human being except a starving savage will touch.” (p. 124).

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Cowboys
Horsemanship
Bridge building in Illinois

With the help of a steam-powered crane, workers place a massive steel beam into a railroad bridge. Steel and concrete bridges allowed for heavier trains and were more durable than the wood and stone bridges they replaced.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Bridges
Railroads
Workers
Places
Illinois
Bridge building near the Illinois and Michigan Canal

A view of a steel railroad bridge under construction in northern Illinois. The steel frame has been built within an older stone bridge visible along the right side of the image. A dredging boat is visible along the river bank.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Bridges
Illinois and Michigan Canal
Transportation
Places
Illinois
Souvenir program from Pawnee Bill's Historic Wild West

As William F. Cody had adopted the persona of Buffalo Bill, in the 1890s Gordon William Lillie adopted the name Pawnee Bill and started his own wild west show.

Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Wild west shows
Places
West (U.S.)
People
Pawnee Bill, 1860-1942
Bridge over the Chicago River

A streetcar crosses one of the the many bridges over the Chicago River. Two large clothing manufacturing businesses are situated on the right side of the bridge.

Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Bridges
Chicago River
Industry
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
Industry on the Chicago River

Sail- and steam-powered ships share the waters the busy port on the Chicago River. The riverfront is dominated by grain elevators and warehouses, and the air appears choked with coal smoke. Quarried stone fills the dock on the north bank of the river, lumber the south bank.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Industry
Shipping
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
A White trapper

Theodore Dodge described the “white trapper” as a romantic historical type in terms similar to Frederick Jackson Turner's story of the frontier: “the first man who discovered the immense extent to which the peltry traffic could be carried was a rover of broad views, who most likely hailed from Kentucky or Missouri, was of French or Scotch-Irish descent, and perchance came from the Alleghenies in the footsteps of Daniel Boone, intent on adventure or flying from civilization.”

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Fur trade
Horsemanship
Lumber docks, Chicago River

Children watch the photographer as a tugboat pulls a ship through the Chicago River. To the left workers unload lumber from a ship.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Children
Industry
Lumber
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
Canadian Mounted Police

One in a series of drawings by Frederic Remington depicting different Western types.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Police
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Soldiers
Places
Canada
Lumber on the docks, Chicago

A view of Chicago's lakefront lumber docks. Ships arrived here from ports in the upper Great Lakes and transferred their cargo to waiting rail cars. The lumber appears to be telegraph poles.

Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Industry
Lumber
Railroads
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Lake Michigan