40 results for “World War II”

Anti-War Dance, 1918

Chicagoans organized many protests against American involvement in World War I, including this Anti-War Dance sponsored by the bohemian Dill Pickle Club. Critics of the war charged that large manufacturers were the most likely to profit from the war while workers were the most likely to die in the trenches. The war deeply divided Chicago's radicals. Some believed that it was necessary to remain loyal to the government once Congress declared war. Others urged active resistance to mobilization and the draft.

Date
1918
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
World War I
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Is War a Necessary Evil?

During the 1930s the U.S. Department of the Interior funded educational public forums throughout the country, promoting a vision of engaged citizenship during the Great Depression. Half a generation after World War I, Americans viewed developments in European politics with alarm. When a new World War began at the end of the decade, it displaced attention and funds from civic initiatives in adult education.

Creator
U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Education
Date
1938
Subjects
Education
The Liberty Bond Mutual Benefit Association-The Money is Mostly Spent at Home

The U.S. entered Europe's Great War in 1917 as a deeply divided nation. To rally the country to the cause of war, the federal government launched a massive public relations effort drawing on the most talented communicators in business, journalism, and government. In this advertisement from the Chicago Tribune of October 1917, popular cartoonist John T. McCutcheon encourages Americans to support the war effort by purchasing government bonds. With the letters US in the background, a circle of men representing different occupations is united by Liberty Bonds. The poster suggests that only un-American outsiders would refuse to support the bond drive.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1917
Subjects
World War I
Pitch In and Help!: Join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps

At harvest time during World War II domestic labor shortages became particularly difficult. U.S. government posters recruited women to join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps to ensure that crops were harvested in time.

Creator
Morley, Hubert
Date
1944
Subjects
Agriculture
Gender and society
World War II
Factory worker filing small gun parts, Milwaukee

Photographers working for the U.S. Office of War Information documented the dependence of factories on women workers. In February 1943 this young woman at the Vilter Manufacturing Company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, had one brother in the Coast Guard, and another going into the Army.

Creator
Hollem, Howard R.
Date
1943
Subjects
Gender and society
World War II
Places
Wisconsin
Ukrainian-Canadian Festival, Saskatoon

A man and woman in traditional dress dance atop a map of Canada. As part of its plan to populate the western provinces the Canadian government encouraged immigration from many European countries. Before World War I cut off trans-Atlantic migration, more than 150,000 Ukrainians had settled in Canada, many of them in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Thousands more arrived in the 1920s. Non-British immigrants often experienced discrimination at the hands of native-born Canadians, and were encouraged to abandon their language and traditional clothes. During World War I, thousands of Ukrainians were imprisoned because they were originally from Canada’s enemy, the Austrian Empire. By the late 1940s, some of the prejudice had tempered as immigrants and their children claimed the right to be Canadians and immigrants.

Creator
Association of Ukrainian Canadians
Date
July 31, 1946
Subjects
Dancers
Immigration
Places
Saskatchewan
Schauplatz des Kriegs zwischen Engelland und seinen Collonien in America, 1776

This map of the “Arena of the War between England and her Colonies in America” was published in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1776, at the beginning of that war. The names of American Indian tribes are visible across the Great Lakes region.

Creator
Jaeger, Johann Christian
Date
1776
Subjects
Indians of North America
Revolutionary War
Places
United States
ADM soybean mill, Decatur, Illinois, April 2007

ADM (formerly Archer Daniels Midland) operates over 200 facilities worldwide that process oilseeds, corn, wheat and cocoa. Founded in Minneapolis in 1902, the company expanded rapidly after World War II. Based in the central Illinois city of Decatur, ADM is one of a handful of global corporations that produce the basic ingredients of modern processed food such as grains, flavors, and protein additives.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2007
Subjects
Agriculture
Industry
Places
Illinois
Types and Development of Man

An illustration from the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, conveys the racialist thinking common at the time.

Creator
Buel, James W., 1849-1920
Date
1904
Subjects
World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904
War Party Coming Home

From a Cheyenne ledger book, probably illustrated between 1877 and 1879, containing drawings by Black Horse and other Cheyenne warrior artists of scenes of warfare, hunting, and courtship. The Black Horse ledger book forms part of a long tradition of the Plains Indians of chronicling their lives pictorially, first on buffalo hides, and later, between 1865 and 1935, on the blank pages of ledger books obtained from U.S. soldiers, traders, missionaries, and reservation employees.

Date
ca 1877-79
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Horsemanship
Indian ledger drawings
Indians of North America
Places
Great Plains
People
Black Horse (Cheyenne)