8 results for “Strikes”

Dill Pickle Club House and Chapel

A handbill advertises three plays at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club. An inset map shows artists' studios nearby. The plays touched on social and political issues including labor conflict, abortion, drug use, and Irish nationalism.

Date
1927
Subjects
Advertisements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Strikes
Theater
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, November 1915

Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Labor unions
Socialism
Strikes
Working class
Scene of Destruction and Pillage in the Panhandle Yards

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
July 8, 1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
The Riot at Forty-Ninth Street, 1894

Chicago was relatively peaceful during the early weeks of the American Railway Union's boycott of Pullman sleeping cars. Major violence erupted only after a federal court ordered the arrest of Eugene Debs and other union leaders on charges that they had violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Ironically, the law was intended to limit the power of large corporations. When federal troops arrived in early July to enforce the court's order, several working-class neighborhoods erupted in violence. Soon after, the boycott was crushed. This clipping from the Chicago Herald recounts the turmoil as workers, especially women, took to the streets to prevent trains from leaving the stockyards.

Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Boycotts
Labor
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
The Garment Workers' Strike

In 1910 and 1915, tens of thousands of Chicago garment workers, many of them young immigrant women, took to the streets to protest their working conditions. Many of the female leaders of the strike were affiliated with the Women's Trade Union League (WTUL), a national organization that sought better conditions for working women through unionization and education.

Date
1915
Subjects
Gender and society
Strikes and lockouts
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
King Debs

In May of 1894, during a severe economic depression, members of the newly formed American Railway Union went on strike to protest the Pullman Company's refusal to reduce rental rates in company housing to match wage cuts. The union, led by Eugene V. Debs, called for a nationwide boycott on handling and repairing Pullman sleeping cars. Business and government leaders felt that a national railroad strike was tantamount to insurrection because it disrupted trade and mail delivery. Federal troops entered Chicago in July to end the strike.

Creator
Rogers, W. A.
Date
1894
Subjects
American Railway Union
Pullman Strike, 1894
Strikes and lockouts
People
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926
Railroad employee reading strike news, Burlington, Iowa

Strikes and government intervention were in the headlines in 1948 as American workers and their unions exerted newly won power to win higher wages. Although this photograph was taken as part of an effort to document life and work along the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, it was never published.

Date
1948
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Railroads
Strikes and lockouts
Places
Iowa
Terrorism

In coordinated raids organized by Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer across the nation during January 1920, federal and local law enforcement officials arrested thousands of radicals, trade union militants, and immigrants. Officials warned that this breach of civil liberties was necessary because radicals were plotting to overthrow the government. In response, the Chicago Federation of Labor's newspaper attacked Palmer's Red Raids as employer-inspired retribution for the massive strikes that had paralyzed industry during 1919.

Creator
Chicago Federation of Labor
Date
January 10, 1920
Subjects
Civil rights
Labor