7 results for “Socialism”

Towards the Dawn!

A family walks an uphill road toward a rising sun symbolizing the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  The Great Depression of the 1930s hit farmers and rural communities particularly hard.  Across the Great Plains rural people supported a variety of political movements that sought greater involvement of national governments in the management of the economy.  In 1932 several Canadian farmer, labor, and socialist groups came together to form a political party known as the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  Influenced by socialist and agrarian reform movements in Europe and North America, he goal of the CCF was an economic system “in which the principle regulating production, distribution and exchange will be the supplying of human needs and not the making of profits,” according an early manifesto.  The CCF moderated some of its more radical positions, but remained a self-described “socialist” party when it won a majority of the seats in the Saskatchewan provincial assembly in 1944.  The CCF maintained its political leadership in province for 20 years enacting important social legislation effecting health care, education, and rural electrification. In the 1960s, the CCF merged with other groups to become the New Democratic Party.

Creator
Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation
Date
ca. 1930s
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Socialism
Working class
Places
Saskatchewan
Demonstrate for Adequate Cash Relief, Chicago, 1936

American workforce was unemployed. Many struggled alone, feeling isolated and disempowered. In Chicago and other large industrial cities, unemployed councils gave voice to the frustrations of the victims of the Depression. Often organized by radicals, the councils demanded increases in relief payments, fought evictions, and illegally turned on gas and electric supplies to poor families cut off by utility companies. The Chicago Commons settlement house worked with the Socialist Party affiliated Illinois Workers Alliance to protest a reduction in relief payments.

Creator
Illinois Workers Alliance
Date
1936
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
Places
Illinois
Sanitary Drinking Cup, Socialist Party Presidential Campaign of 1912

A re-usable drinking cup with the pictures of 1912 Socialist Party candidates for President and Vice President of the U.S. Eugene V. Debs ran for President five times between 1900 and 1920, the last time from federal prison, where he was incarcerated for his antiwar sentiments. In 1912 the Socialist Party reached its high water mark, winning nearly a million votes. Chicago socialist May Walden conceived the idea for this cup as a fund raising novelty.

Date
1912
Subjects
Political campaigns
Socialism
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, November 1915

Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Labor unions
Socialism
Strikes
Working class
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, October 1915

Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
Cover to _International Socialist Review_, February 1916

A worker pauses for his mid-day meal. Gazing beyond an industrial landscape he focuses on a domed building symbolizing the seat of government. Published by Charles H. Kerr Co. from 1900 to 1918, the International Socialist Review became the principal voice of the Socialist Party's left wing, utilizing the format of a mass circulation magazine.

Date
February 1916
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
Woman's Protest Against Woman Suffrage

Chicago novelist Caroline F. Corbin considered socialism and women's suffrage closely allied evils. Together, she believed, the two would undermine the traditional family and ultimately harm women. In 1897, Corbin formed the Illinois Association Opposed to the Extension of Suffrage to Women (IAOESW). In this tract, IAOESW argues that imposing the obligations of suffrage upon women will undermine their ability to fulfill their civic responsibilities as mothers and wives. Instead, it argues that women are fully represented by the votes of their husbands, brothers, and sons.

Creator
Illinois Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage
Date
1909
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Suffrage