5 results for “Sherwood Anderson”

Sherwood Anderson, "Jack Jones--The Pickler."

In this article from the Chicago Daily News, the novelist Sherwood Anderson describes the diverse audience at the Dill Pickle Club: “The street car conductor sits on a bench beside the college professor, the literary critic, the earnest young wife, who hungers for culture, and the hobo.”

Creator
Sherwood Anderson
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Portrait of Jack Jones, 1919

A portrait of Jack Jones by Polish immigrant artist Stanislaus Szukalski. A Canadian by birth, and a one-time labor organizer, Jones managed the Dill Pickle Club in Chicago from 1914 to 1931. His friend and collaborator Szukalski, who maintained a studio nearby, was a modernist painter and sculptor and part of the city's bohemian cultural scene. The portrait appeared in an article about Jones by the novelist Sherwood Anderson (image #137).

Creator
Szukalski, Stanislaus
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Immigration
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Dill Pickle Lending Library

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, 'The Pickle' welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Step High, Stoop Low, Leave Your Dignity Outside: Entrance to the Dill Pickle Club, 18 Tooker Alley

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, “The Pickle” welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Date
ca. 1920-1930
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Margaret Sanger's Chicago speaking engagements, 1916

In 1913 and 1914 New Yorker Margaret Sanger published several articles on birth control, venereal disease, and women's rights that resulted in federal obscenity charges against her. When the charges were dropped in 1916 Sanger toured the country giving lectures promoting birth control. Chicagoan Margaret C. Anderson, editor of The Little Review, was an ardent supporter of birth control, and used her magazine to promote Sanger's lectures.

Date
1916
Subjects
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)