74 results for “Saint Clair County (Ill.)”

Farm residences in St. Clair County, Illinois

Representations of the farms of Ernst Dressel and Otto Schott, both in St. Clair County, Illinois, near East St. Louis, suggest subtle variations in the ways in which farmers sought to be represented to their neighbors and to history.

Date
1892
Places
Illinois
Saint Clair County (Ill.)
Residence of Ira A. Warren, Emmett Township, Calhoun County, Michigan

Ira and Susan Warren resided in Calhoun, County, Michigan, near the city of Battle Creek. They likely paid in advance for a copy of the History of Calhoun County, receiving in exchange a biographic entry and an artist's rendering of their property as a neat and prosperous farm. At the top center of the page is an inset portraying “the old homestead” built four decades earlier.

Creator
Pierce, H. B.
Date
1877
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Log cabins
Places
Michigan
Oak Park Farm

In the late 19th century prosperous farmers like Henry Coppock of Johnson County in eastern Kansas often paid to have elaborate engravings of their properties placed in county atlases. In this case, a map of the property with images of crops and animals accompanies the image the farm buildings and grounds. The map indicates that Coppock's farm was on two major roads and a rail line that linked him to the nearby urban hub of Kansas City.

Creator
Heisler, E. F.
Smith, D. M.
Date
1874
Subjects
Agriculture
Mapping
Transportation
Places
Kansas
McClure Farm, Franklin County, Indiana

This image of a well-established farm in south eastern Indiana is an example of the many county atlases produced in midwestern states during the late 19th century. The accompanying text (readable in the second image) relates the McClure's family history including their origins in western Ireland, and James McClure's political affiliation.

Date
1882
Subjects
Agriculture
Immigration
Mapping
Places
Indiana
Demonstrate for Adequate Cash Relief, Chicago, 1936

American workforce was unemployed. Many struggled alone, feeling isolated and disempowered. In Chicago and other large industrial cities, unemployed councils gave voice to the frustrations of the victims of the Depression. Often organized by radicals, the councils demanded increases in relief payments, fought evictions, and illegally turned on gas and electric supplies to poor families cut off by utility companies. The Chicago Commons settlement house worked with the Socialist Party affiliated Illinois Workers Alliance to protest a reduction in relief payments.

Creator
Illinois Workers Alliance
Date
1936
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
Places
Illinois
Plan de Missilimakinak avec la description de la route du Missisipi

The upper right quadrant of the image details the Straits of Mackinac region, including the fort and Indian village at Saint Ignace and the fort established across the Straits at latter-day Mackinaw City; 16 lines of accompanying notes mention the presence of 600 coureurs de bois in 1716. On same sheet are maps of the Fort Chambly in Québec and Fort Frontenac (later the site of Kingston, Ontario).

Date
ca. 1717
Subjects
Empire
Indians of North America
Mapping
Places
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
Chicago American Indian Conference, 1961

In 1961, a week-long gathering at the University of Chicago attracted hundreds of Indian people from across the country. The Chicago American Indian Conference resulted in a Declaration of Indian Purpose and helped mobilize a generation of Indian activists. This photograph illustrates both the broad representation at the conference and the growing strains of generational conflict. Attendees included Irene Mack (Menominee) at the microphone; fourth row right Father Peter Powell; third row right, second from aisle Clyde Warrior (Ponca), Mel Thom (Northern Pauite), and Leo La Clair (Muckleshoot).

Creator
Weil, F. Peter
Date
1961
Subjects
Indians of North America
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Don't Shop Downtown Until Willis Goes

Chicago activists distributed the “Stop! Don't Shop Downtown” flyer during a campaign to oust Chicago Public Schools superintendent Benjamin Willis. Activists charged Willis with supporting segregated and inadequately funded schools for African Americans. In 1965, over 100,000 Chicago Public School students joined a two-day school boycott to protest the renewal of Willis's contract by the Chicago Board of Education.

Creator
Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
Date
1963
Subjects
African American life
Boycotts
Civil rights
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Anarchismus

This book was written by the author while in prison awaiting execution for his participation in the Chicago Haymarket Square riot. Albert Parsons was executed on November 11, 1887. Anarchismus is the German translation of Parsons' work, published by his wife Lucy. Only 300 copies of the English version of the book were circulated, the rest being confiscated by police. The German-language version, however, seems to have circulated freely among Chicago's large German speaking population.

Creator
Parsons, Albert R.
Date
1887
Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Cover of program for Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World

A program from Cody's Wild West Show at the World's Columbian Exposition. These dramatic open air performances highlighted the horse riding and shooting skills of Euro-American and American Indian performers, and claimed to recreate historical events such as the Battle of Little Big Horn.

Date
1893
Subjects
Theater
Wild west shows
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
West (U.S.)
People
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917