26 results for “Political campaigns”

Towards the Dawn!

A family walks an uphill road toward a rising sun symbolizing the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  The Great Depression of the 1930s hit farmers and rural communities particularly hard.  Across the Great Plains rural people supported a variety of political movements that sought greater involvement of national governments in the management of the economy.  In 1932 several Canadian farmer, labor, and socialist groups came together to form a political party known as the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  Influenced by socialist and agrarian reform movements in Europe and North America, he goal of the CCF was an economic system “in which the principle regulating production, distribution and exchange will be the supplying of human needs and not the making of profits,” according an early manifesto.  The CCF moderated some of its more radical positions, but remained a self-described “socialist” party when it won a majority of the seats in the Saskatchewan provincial assembly in 1944.  The CCF maintained its political leadership in province for 20 years enacting important social legislation effecting health care, education, and rural electrification. In the 1960s, the CCF merged with other groups to become the New Democratic Party.

Creator
Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation
Date
ca. 1930s
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Socialism
Working class
Places
Saskatchewan
Earth flags and Golden Arches

Police cordon surround an antiwar march, March 2004, Chicago. The Earth flags carried by protesters and the corporate advertising in the background are contrasting symbols of globalization.

Creator
Koslow, Jennifer
Date
2004
Subjects
Police
Political campaigns
Protests
Sanitary Drinking Cup, Socialist Party Presidential Campaign of 1912

A re-usable drinking cup with the pictures of 1912 Socialist Party candidates for President and Vice President of the U.S. Eugene V. Debs ran for President five times between 1900 and 1920, the last time from federal prison, where he was incarcerated for his antiwar sentiments. In 1912 the Socialist Party reached its high water mark, winning nearly a million votes. Chicago socialist May Walden conceived the idea for this cup as a fund raising novelty.

Date
1912
Subjects
Political campaigns
Socialism
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926
Custer's Last Battle in New Light

In 1927 William Hale Thompson, the mayor of Chicago, had been elected to a third term after vigorously attacking school history textbooks as too pro-British. He sought to commission the writing of a new textbook that would be more “American.” A delegation of Sioux visited Thompson in December 1927 to make the case that a new textbook should correct misleading accounts of American Indian history, including the battle at Little Big Horn.

Creator
Lorenz, Alma
Date
1927
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Education
Indians of North America
Political campaigns
Visions of history
Places
Chicago
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Tippecanoe, the Hero of North Bend

Sheet music published during William Henry Harrison's campaign for president in 1840 recalled his role in the battle at Tippecanoe Creek in Indiana in 1811. Harrison was then governor of the Indiana Territory and led an attack on Indians led by Tecumseh and his brother, the Shawnee Prophet.

Date
1849
Subjects
Log cabins
Political campaigns
Sheet music
Places
Indiana
Woman's Protest Against Woman Suffrage

Chicago novelist Caroline F. Corbin considered socialism and women's suffrage closely allied evils. Together, she believed, the two would undermine the traditional family and ultimately harm women. In 1897, Corbin formed the Illinois Association Opposed to the Extension of Suffrage to Women (IAOESW). In this tract, IAOESW argues that imposing the obligations of suffrage upon women will undermine their ability to fulfill their civic responsibilities as mothers and wives. Instead, it argues that women are fully represented by the votes of their husbands, brothers, and sons.

Creator
Illinois Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage
Date
1909
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Suffrage
Portrait of Theodore Roosevelt

Future U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt is pictured here wearing buckskin and carrying a hunting rifle. After the death of his first wife in childbirth, Roosevelt moved to his ranch in the Dakota Territory where he wrote Hunting Trips of a Ranchman. The son of a wealthy New York businessman, Roosevelt chose to have himself portrayed as a rugged frontiersman.

Creator
Frost, A. B.
Date
1885
Subjects
Political leaders
Places
Dakota Territory
Great Plains
People
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Color satellite photo of the Great Lakes

In satellite imagery, the Great Lakes dominate the landscape of central North America, uninterrupted by the political boundaries between the U.S. and Canada, or between states and provinces.

Creator
Leshkevich, G.
Date
1995
Subjects
Great Lakes Region
Mapping
Places
Great Lakes
Dill Pickle Club House and Chapel

A handbill advertises three plays at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club. An inset map shows artists' studios nearby. The plays touched on social and political issues including labor conflict, abortion, drug use, and Irish nationalism.

Date
1927
Subjects
Advertisements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Strikes
Theater
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Tens-Kwau-Ta-Waw, the Prophet

Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, led a major religious movement among Indians in the Midwest between 1805 and 1813. His brother Tecumseh led a parallel political effort to unify Indians in resistance to the encroachment of white settlement.

Creator
Inman, Henry, 1801-1846
King, Charles Bird, 1785-1862
Date
1848
Subjects
Indians of North America
Religion