5 results for “Parsons, Lucy”

Photograph of Lucy Parsons

Parsons self-identified as Native American and Chicana. Her family said she was black. Parsons grew up in Texas where she met Albert Richard Parsons in 1869. They married in 1872, although there is not a marriage license on record, and they moved to Chicago in 1873. Lucy Parsons was a prominent figure in Chicago's anarchist and radical labor circles until her death in 1942.

Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Parsons, Lucy
Anarchismus

This book was written by the author while in prison awaiting execution for his participation in the Chicago Haymarket Square riot. Albert Parsons was executed on November 11, 1887. Anarchismus is the German translation of Parsons' work, published by his wife Lucy. Only 300 copies of the English version of the book were circulated, the rest being confiscated by police. The German-language version, however, seems to have circulated freely among Chicago's large German speaking population.

Creator
Parsons, Albert R.
Date
1887
Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Step High, Stoop Low, Leave Your Dignity Outside: Entrance to the Dill Pickle Club, 18 Tooker Alley

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, “The Pickle” welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Date
ca. 1920-1930
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Dill Pickle Lending Library

Among Chicago's most unusual contributions to the culture of modern urban life was the Dill Pickle Club, located at 18 Tooker Alley just east of Bughouse Square. Operating as a coffeehouse, art gallery, and speakeasy, 'The Pickle' welcomed hoboes, prostitutes, professors, and every variety of nonconformist passing through Chicago. The club hosted weekend jazz dance parties and little theater productions of Strindberg, Ibsen, O'Neill, and local playwrights. It hosted serious lectures by university professors and spoof debates staged for pure entertainment. In its early years, the Pickle was a meeting place for some of Chicago's most famous authors, intellectuals, and radicals, including Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, Floyd Dell, Clarence Darrow, Ben Reitman, Lucy Parsons, Ralph Chaplin, Ben Hecht, Harriet Monroe, and Vachel Lindsay.

Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Haymarket Monument, Waldheim Cemetery

A monument to four anarchist labor leaders executed in Chicago on November 11, 1887. After a trial that is generally considered a miscarriage of justice, the men were convicted of killing police with a bomb. The words at the base of the statue are those of Albert Parsons, “The day will come when our silence will be more powerful than the voices you are throttling today.” Other important labor and radical leaders, including Emma Goldman, chose to be buried near this monument.

Creator
Weinert, Albert
Subjects
Anarchism
Labor unions
Radicalism
Visions of history
Places
Chicago, Illinois