5 results for “Montana”

Chief American Horse, Northern Cheyenne

Oil on canvas. Signed “E.A. Burbank, Lame Deer, Mont., 1897.”

Creator
Burbank, E. A. (Elbridge Ayer), 1858-1949
Date
1897
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Places
Montana
People
American Horse, Dakota Chief, 1840-1908
Postcard representing Custer's Last Fight

Postcard depicting Custer's last fight at the Battle of Little Big Horn. The postcard is not addressed nor has it been mailed. This image was distributed as a poster by the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association in 1896.

Date
ca. 1896
Subjects
Advertising
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Places
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
Montana
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
I Await the Devil's Coming

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films. Never married, she lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Creator
MacLane, Mary
Date
1901
Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Places
Montana
The Massacre of United States Troops by the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians Near Fort Philip Kearney, Dakotah Territory, December 22nd, 1866

In 1866 U. S. soldiers sought to defend three recently built forts protecting the Bozeman Trail leading to the gold fields of Montana. Lieutenant Colonel W. J. Fetterman led eighty men against the Sioux, expecting an easy victory, and he and all his soldiers were killed. A peace treaty was concluded in 1868.

Date
January 19, 1867
Subjects
Cheyenne Indians
Indians of North America
Sioux
Places
Dakota Territory
Mary MacLane

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films, one based on her book Men Who Have Made Love To Me. Never married, MacLane lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Date
1903
People
MacLane, Mary