4 results for “MacLane, Mary”

Mary MacLane

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films, one based on her book Men Who Have Made Love To Me. Never married, MacLane lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Date
1903
People
MacLane, Mary
I Await the Devil's Coming

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films. Never married, she lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Creator
MacLane, Mary
Date
1901
Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Places
Montana
Indian shooting fish

A Native American man crouches at the bank of a river. He holds a bow and arrow and aims at the water.

Creator
Eastman, Seth, 1808-1875
Date
1853
Subjects
Fishing
Indians of North America
Places
Great Lakes Region
The Grand Council

American Indians gather along a river in conference. Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the upper Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a panoramic painting nearly half a mile in length, which was a popular theater attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published a book based on his panorama. “The Grand Council” accompanies a chapter, written by Mary Eastman, titled “Shah-Co-Pee: Orator of the Sioux.”

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Government
Indians of North America
Theater
Places
Mississippi River Valley