5 results for “Lumber”

Lumber on the docks, Chicago

A view of Chicago's lakefront lumber docks. Ships arrived here from ports in the upper Great Lakes and transferred their cargo to waiting rail cars. The lumber appears to be telegraph poles.

Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Industry
Lumber
Railroads
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Lake Michigan
Lumber docks, Chicago River

Children watch the photographer as a tugboat pulls a ship through the Chicago River. To the left workers unload lumber from a ship.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Children
Industry
Lumber
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
Industry along the Chicago River and Lake Michigan

A view of the lumber docks and rail yard at the mouth of the Chicago River. The city's skyline is visible in the distance, partially obscured by smoke.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Industry
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
Lake Michigan
Industry on the Chicago River

Sail- and steam-powered ships share the waters the busy port on the Chicago River. The riverfront is dominated by grain elevators and warehouses, and the air appears choked with coal smoke. Quarried stone fills the dock on the north bank of the river, lumber the south bank.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Industry
Shipping
Transportation
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago River
English lessons

Finnish-speaking lumber workers in Duluth, Minnesota, learn English through a class in parliamentary procedure. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries tens of millions of farmers and workers from Europe, Asia, and Latin America moved to North America in search of work. Although anti-immigrant sentiment, and sometimes violence, was common in the U.S. and Canada, governments and private agencies also tried to teach immigrants the culture and language of their adopted land. In some cases, immigrants eagerly participated in these “Americanization” and Canadianization” programs, especially when immigrants considered the programs helpful to their own goals. But in other cases, immigrants rejected and resented forced conformity.

Date
1930s
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Minnesota