7 results for “Literature”

Sharecropper, cover of _New Anvil,_ May-June 1940

Jack Conroy, a worker and proletarian writer born in a coal mining camp in Missouri, moved to Chicago in 1938, where he worked on the Illinois Writers Project and edited the New Anvil, a small literary magazine, with Nelson Algren.

Creator
de Graff, Stanley
Date
1940
Subjects
Literature
Working class
People
Conroy, Jack
Writers Mobilize Against Fascism

In this editorial from the Anvil, a group of midwestern working class writers survey the economic and political scene of the Great Depression. Many writers and artists joined a loose coalition known as the Popular Front that aimed to stem the growth of conservative influence in the U.S. Here Jack Conroy and his co-editors write in support of the first American Writers Congress held in New York City in 1935.

Creator
Jack Conroy, Walter Snow, Clinton Simpson, J.S. Balch, Will Wharton, Jean Winkler
Date
1935
Subjects
Literature
Places
Moberly, Missouri
New York
Eunice Tietjens

Eunice Hammond Tietjens (1884-1944) poses in a robe that suggests her interest in the cultures of Asia. Tietjens was long associated with the literary and artistic circle around Harriet Monroe's Poetry Magazine. The daughter of a prominent family, she had an unconventional education in Europe, traveled to Japan, China, and the South Pacific as an adult, and developed an interest in eastern philosophies and religions. At different times she was a poet, novelist, journalist, author of children's books, lecturer, and editor.

Subjects
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois
People
Tietjens, Eunice
I Await the Devil's Coming

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films. Never married, she lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Creator
MacLane, Mary
Date
1901
Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Places
Montana
Child of the Dead and Forgotten Gods

Born on a Mississippi plantation in 1908, Richard Wright moved to Chicago in 1927. While working in the Post Office he joined the Communist Party's cultural organization, the John Reed Club in order to develop his writing. In 1934, he published two poems in Jack Conroy's literary journal Anvil—not his first publication as Conroy typed at the top of this page, but his first in a magazine that claimed national circulation. Wright went on to write the best-selling novels Native Son and Black Boy. He left the Communist Party in the 1940s, and lived in France until his death in 1960.

Creator
Wright, Richard
Date
1934
Subjects
Communism
Literature
Working class
Photograph of Margery Currey Dell

Margery Currey Dell and her husband Floyd Dell were part of a social network of writers, journalists and artists who comprised the literary movement known as the Chicago Renaissance.

Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Suffrage
People
Currey, Margery
Sherwood Anderson, "Jack Jones--The Pickler."

In this article from the Chicago Daily News, the novelist Sherwood Anderson describes the diverse audience at the Dill Pickle Club: “The street car conductor sits on a bench beside the college professor, the literary critic, the earnest young wife, who hungers for culture, and the hobo.”

Creator
Sherwood Anderson
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois