31 results for “Gender and society”

Theodore Roosevelt to Edith Wyatt

Despite mixed feelings, Theodore Roosevelt officially supported women's suffrage in his 1912 presidential campaign. His discomfort with the subject is evident in a letter he wrote in reply to Chicago literary critic Edith Franklin Wyatt. Roosevelt suggests that women's suffrage might help in the fight against prostitution. He also expresses doubts about the positive effects of women's votes, however, noting that there has been little change in states that have granted them suffrage.

Creator
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Date
December 15, 1912
Subjects
Gender and society
Suffrage
People
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Woman's Protest Against Woman Suffrage

Chicago novelist Caroline F. Corbin considered socialism and women's suffrage closely allied evils. Together, she believed, the two would undermine the traditional family and ultimately harm women. In 1897, Corbin formed the Illinois Association Opposed to the Extension of Suffrage to Women (IAOESW). In this tract, IAOESW argues that imposing the obligations of suffrage upon women will undermine their ability to fulfill their civic responsibilities as mothers and wives. Instead, it argues that women are fully represented by the votes of their husbands, brothers, and sons.

Creator
Illinois Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage
Date
1909
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Suffrage
Pitch In and Help!: Join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps

At harvest time during World War II domestic labor shortages became particularly difficult. U.S. government posters recruited women to join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps to ensure that crops were harvested in time.

Creator
Morley, Hubert
Date
1944
Subjects
Agriculture
Gender and society
World War II
Photograph of Margery Currey Dell

Margery Currey Dell and her husband Floyd Dell were part of a social network of writers, journalists and artists who comprised the literary movement known as the Chicago Renaissance.

Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Suffrage
People
Currey, Margery
World Fashions Make Aurora a Style Center

In the 1920s and 1930s, the International Corset Company of Aurora, Illinois was a major manufacturer of foundation garments. During the 1920s it sponsored the International School of Scientific Corsetry to provide training to corset salespeople. For the Aurora centennial in 1937, the company boasted that its international reputation put Aurora on the map of world fashion.

Creator
Zak, Karel J.
Date
1937
Subjects
Advertising
Gender and society
Industry
Annie Oakley

The sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926) was born Phoebe Ann Moses to a poor Ohio farming family. To feed and support her family she learned to trap and shoot, and later performed shooting tricks on stage. She became a regular part of William Cody's Wild West Show in 1885. This portrait from 1899 suggests how Oakley stretched the conventional roles for women in the late 19th century as an expert shooter, although she always wore a skirt and rode sidesaddle in deference to audiences expectations.

Creator
Fox, Richard, K.
Date
1899
Subjects
Gender and society
Theater
Wild West Show
Rights of Married Women

Myra Colby Bradwell began publishing the Chicago Legal News in 1868, to agitate for a wide range of women's rights. In this editorial, Bradwell argued for the broadest possible interpretation of an 1869 Illinois law granting married women the right to control their own incomes. As a married woman, Bradwell confronted several legal problems. She had to obtain a special state charter in order to control the publication of her own newspaper. Also, she was qualified to become an attorney, but she was denied admission to the bar because she was married. She appealed this decision to the United States Supreme Court, but lost. Twenty years later, Illinois changed its law and, acting on her original petition of 1869, admitted Bradwell to the bar.

Creator
Bradwell, Myra
Date
1869
Subjects
Civil rights
Gender and society
Law
People
Bradwell, Myra
Cover to _What Every Girl Should Know_

The pamphlet What Every Girl Should Know is a compilation of Sanger's early articles on birth control. Sanger had been prosecuted for transmitting “obscene” materials through the mail. By the 1920s, the federal government loosened its enforcement on mailing birth control information, although the obscenity laws were not formally overturned until the 1960s.

Creator
Sanger, Margaret
Date
1922
Subjects
Gender and society
Law
Capitalism, Humanity, Government

Chicago's anarchist community participated in a national and international debate about the nature of state power in modern society. This cover of Emma Goldman's Mother Earth magazine, drawn by the Dada artist Man Ray, depicts humanity torn apart by capitalism and government, each a different manifestation of the same monstrous reality. Although published in New York City, Mother Earth reported regularly on the activities of Chicago anarchists, and Goldman spent a good deal of time in the city.

Creator
Man Ray
Date
August 1914
People
Goldman, Emma
Will Amazonic Women Usurp Man's Sphere?

An advertisement for a lecture at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club, printed on the reverse of an advertisement for a lecture by Magnus Hirschfeld. Little is known about the speaker, Elizabeth Davis, who appears to have been part of the bohemian community on Chicago's north side.

Creator
Dill Pickle Club
Date
1931
Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
homosexuality
Places
Chicago (Ill.)