18 results for “Fur trade”

Imaginary view of the site of Chicago in 1779

This vision of some of Chicago's earliest residents was the first image in A.T. Andreas' 1886 History of Chicago. The caption notes, the site was then known as “Eschicago” and identifies the building on the north shore of the river as the cabin of Afro-French trader Jean Baptiste Point De Sable. Since the 1600s the area around the mouth of the Chicago River had been a trading ground for various Native American groups, French traders, and their mixed-race descendants.

Creator
Andreas, A. T. (Alfred Theodore), 1839-1900
Date
1884
Subjects
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Fur trade contract, 1692

Fur trade contract, dated Sept. 15, 1692 in Ville-Marie, Québec, concerning transport of merchandise to Michilimackinac and Chicago to be traded for beaver pelts. The contract describes an agreement between François Francoeur dit Lavalle—represented here by his wife Marie Magdeleine St.-Jean, authorized by him to conduct their joint business affairs while he was away “aux Illinois”—and four voyageurs: Simon Guillory, Jean Baptiste Jarry, Louis Roy, and by proxy, Simon Roy. For 500 livres each in beaver pelts, and their food, the voyageurs agreed to make the journey to Michilimackinac and “Chicagou” (one of the earliest references to Chicago in a voyageur contract) the following spring, in two canoes to be furnished by them, to transport merchandise, and to make the return with beaver pelts. At each of the trading centers, the four voyageurs have permission to use one of the canoes to trade 300 livres of merchandise each for personal profit. There are also provisions concerning voyageurs “hyvernants,” those who spend the winter out in trapping country in Illinois. The contract includes Francoeur's footnotes in margins, marked in the text with a sequence of carats and circles. Each addition is initialed by two or three of the parties involved, and the document is signed by St.-Jean and Guillory; the notary, Maugue; and witnesses Jean Legras and Adrien Betouni. Jarry and Roy did not sign, as they did not know how to write their names.

Creator
Francoeur, François
Guillory, Simon
Jarry, Jean Baptiste
Roy, Louis
Roy, Simon
St.-Jean, Marie Magdeleine
Date
1692
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Fur trade
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
French Canada
Great Lakes
Québec
People
Francoeur dit Lavalle, François
Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin in 1830

Artist Henry Lewis sketched and painted scenes along the upper Mississippi River between 1846 and 1848. He compiled them into a panoramic painting nearly half a mile in length, which was a popular theater attraction in the U.S. and Europe. Later he settled in Germany where he published a book based on his panorama.

Creator
Lewis, Henry, 1819-1904
Date
1857
Subjects
Fur trade
Theater
Places
Mississippi River Valley
Wisconsin
Portrait of Henry Belland, "the Voyageur"

Frank Blackwell Mayer was a Baltimore artist who traveled independently in 1851 to Minnesota to observe and sketch the Sioux Indians present at treaty negotiations at Traverse des Sioux and Mendota. In May of 1851 Mayer left Maryland and journeyed via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Missouri, St. Paul, and Fort Snelling. After visiting Kaposia he accompanied the treaty commissioners to Traverse des Sioux, arriving June 30. Mayer returned to Baltimore by October, having recorded impressions of his travels in a series of sketchbooks and a diary.

Creator
Mayer, Frank Blackwell, 1827-1899
Date
1851
Subjects
Fur trade
Places
Minnesota
People
Mayer, Frank Blackwell, 1827-1899
An Indian trapper

A depiction of an Indian on horseback in a mountainous landscape. Theodore Dodge described the “Indian Trapper” as a common character in the northern Rocky Mountains before the 1860s: a contract worker for the Hudson's Bay Company hunting furs for the European market.

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Fur trade
Horsemanship
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
A White trapper

Theodore Dodge described the “white trapper” as a romantic historical type in terms similar to Frederick Jackson Turner's story of the frontier: “the first man who discovered the immense extent to which the peltry traffic could be carried was a rover of broad views, who most likely hailed from Kentucky or Missouri, was of French or Scotch-Irish descent, and perchance came from the Alleghenies in the footsteps of Daniel Boone, intent on adventure or flying from civilization.”

Creator
Remington, Frederic, 1861-1909
Date
1894
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Fur trade
Horsemanship
Fur trade contract, 1721

Signed contract, dated June 5, 1721 in Villemarie [Ile de Montréal, Québec], between Gilles Chauvin, Pierre Hubert Lacroix (and by proxy, Jacques Hubert Lacroix), associates of the Compagnies des Indes, and Pierre-Charles de Liette, in which the associates agree to provide de Liette with a canoe and guides for his journey from Montréal in exchange for two safe conduct passes. In the face of an impending investigation by the French government into the activities of the failing Compagnie des Indes, de Liette has resigned his commissions, and plans to leave Montréal. The commanding general has given him two passes which he signs over to Gilles Chauvin and Pierre Lacroix on the eve of their departure to the upper territories. In return, they agree to furnish de Liette with a canoe and four voyageur-guides as far as Fort Michilimackinac in Michigan, at which point de Liette will exchange canoes and receive two other guides to continue on to his final destination. De Liette is also obliged to see that the canoe and the guides are returned to Michilimakinac the following spring. The contract is signed by de Liette, Chauvin, Pierre Hubert Lacroix, local witnesses Théophile Barthe and Andre Dorien, and “notaire royal,” Jacques David.

Creator
Liette, Pierre de, d. 1721
Date
1721
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Compagnie des Indes
Fur trade
Places
Fort Michilimackinac (Mackinaw City, Mich.)
French Canada
Montréal (Québec)
Ville-Marie (Québec)
People
Chauvin, Gilles
Lacroix, Jacques Hubert
Lacroix, Pierre Hubert
Liette, Pierre de
Front View of the American Fur Company Buildings, Fond du Lac

Thomas McKenney accompanied Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory, to the far west of Lake Superior during the summer of 1826 to meet with American Indian leaders and search for the source of the Mississippi River. This drawing shows the American Fur Trading Company post including a fenced garden area. In his description of the post, McKenney identified separate cemetaries for whites and American Indians behind the garden.

Date
1827
Subjects
Agriculture
American Fur Company
Fur trade
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)
American Fur Company's factory, Lake Superior

The first page of an eight page supplement to the December 1842 edition of Saturday Magazine, printed in London, England. The supplement traces the development and progression of the fur trade, suggesting the international interest in the commerce of central North America.

Date
1842
Subjects
American Fur Company
Fur trade
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)
Lake Superior
Back view of the American Fur Company buildings, Fond du Lac

Thomas McKenney accompanied Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory, to the far west of Lake Superior during the summer of 1826 to meet with American Indian leaders and search for the source of the Mississippi River. This drawing looks south across the St. Louis River showing the post's garden and cabins and, across the river, encampments of American Indians.

Date
1827
Subjects
Agriculture
Fur trade
Indians of North America
Places
Fond du Lac (Duluth, Minn.)