16 results for “Education”

Enlightened Public Opinion

During the 1930s and 1940s, the federal government sponsored a variety of adult education programs including lectures, study courses, and language instruction. This poster from the U.S. Office of Education promotes the idea that the cultivation of public opinion through these programs would contribute to orderly civic discussion and democratic self-governance. Government-sponsored discussion groups and lectures co-existed with forums organized along political or religious lines.

Creator
U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Education
Date
1938
Subjects
Citizenship
Education
J. W. Noseworthy and his class at the Hollinger Mine

A group of immigrant miners learns English in a “Frontier College” classroom. During the early 20th century, Canadian mining, timber, and railroad companies recruited thousands of young men from Europe to work as wage laborers. Living in remote work camps, workers endured difficult conditions and had little contact with mainstream Canadian society. The “Frontier College” was an effort to bring Canadian culture to these workers, teach them English, and discourage radicalism. Young Canadian men, like J.W. Noseworthy pictured here, lived and worked alongside immigrants, and during the evening offered classes and access to reading materials.

Date
1914
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Canada
Ontario
Cheap Farms for Settlers

A broadside advertising land for sale in western Iowa. In addition to selling farm land, the American Emigrant Company recruited European workers and farmers to migrate to the western United States, arranged their travel and work contracts, and handled money sent home by immigrants. Prominent business and political leaders were major investors in the company.

Date
1865
Subjects
Advertisements
Education
Farming
Immigration
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Charles A. Eastman at Knox College in 1880

Also known by his Dakota name Ohiyesa, Eastman grew up with his grandmother and uncle in Manitobabut became a Christian at his father's urging. He attended Knox and Dartmouth Colleges, and received a medical degree from Boston University. He married a white classmate, Elaine Goodale, and then served as a medical officer at the Pine Ridge reservation in the early 1890s.

Date
1880
Subjects
Education
Indians of North America
Sioux
Places
Illinois
Chicago's Interracial Debating Classic, January 25, 1931

Before the advent of television, lectures and debates provided public entertainment. Social activists used these venues to present their ideas and to educate their constituencies. This flyer promotes a debate involving A. Philip Randolph and Chandler Owen, both leaders of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP), as optimists, and Ben Reitman and David Tullman, both white radicals associated with the Dill Pickle Club, as pessimists. Although the exact topic of the debate is unclear, both sides supported unionization as well as racial integration. In 1931, the BSCP was engaged in a campaign to gain formal recognition as the union of African American porters and maids who worked on Pullman sleeping cars.

Date
1931
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Dill Pickle Club
Education
Labor
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
Reitman, Ben
Custer's Last Battle in New Light

In 1927 William Hale Thompson, the mayor of Chicago, had been elected to a third term after vigorously attacking school history textbooks as too pro-British. He sought to commission the writing of a new textbook that would be more “American.” A delegation of Sioux visited Thompson in December 1927 to make the case that a new textbook should correct misleading accounts of American Indian history, including the battle at Little Big Horn.

Creator
Lorenz, Alma
Date
1927
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Education
Indians of North America
Political campaigns
Visions of history
Places
Chicago
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Is Free Love Possible?

An advertisement for a debate on free love at the Dill Pickle Club.

Date
1930
Subjects
Advertisements
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Education
Gender and society
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Eighth Map to accompany Willard's _History of the United States_

Maps such as these appeared in books for schoolchildren learning history and geography. Unlike earlier maps, this one presents the area west of the Appalachian Mountains as empty land.

Creator
Maverick, Samuel, 1789-1845
Date
1828
Subjects
Education
Empire
Indians of North America
Mapping
Places
United States
College of Complexes curriculum, April 1972

Topics addressed at the College of Complexes in 1972 included the psychology of sex, American Indian rights, and the future of cable television. Managed by Slim Brundage, the College was part tavern and part lecture hall. Decades earlier, Brundage worked at the Dill Pickle Club.

Date
1972
Subjects
Amusements
Education
English lessons

Finnish-speaking lumber workers in Duluth, Minnesota, learn English through a class in parliamentary procedure. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries tens of millions of farmers and workers from Europe, Asia, and Latin America moved to North America in search of work. Although anti-immigrant sentiment, and sometimes violence, was common in the U.S. and Canada, governments and private agencies also tried to teach immigrants the culture and language of their adopted land. In some cases, immigrants eagerly participated in these “Americanization” and Canadianization” programs, especially when immigrants considered the programs helpful to their own goals. But in other cases, immigrants rejected and resented forced conformity.

Date
1930s
Subjects
Education
Immigration
Places
Minnesota