24 results for “Dill Pickle Club”

A Night in Bohemia: Dill Pickle Masked Ball

Among the most popular Dill Pickle Club events were its frequent masquerade balls. These events appealed to a broad range of partygoers, allowing wealthy residents of the Gold Coast to mingle in relative anonymity with working people and artists. Masquerade balls also attracted gay men and women. Under cover of the party, women could dress as men and men as women. With so many people cross-dressing, few took notice of same sex couples. Although the Dill Pickle Club closed early in the 1930s, citywide Halloween Balls continued to be meeting places for gay men and women into the 1940s.

Date
1916
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Advertisement for a lecture by Dr. Magnus Hirshfeld, Chicago, 1931.

Magnus Hirschfeld, an openly gay German physician, was a long-time advocate of human rights for sexual minorities. He founded the Scientific Humanitarian Committee in 1897 to advocate for the decriminalization of homosexuality in Germany and the World League for Sexual Reform on a Scientific Basis in 1928. Hirschfeld's lecture at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club in 1931 was said to have drawn an audience of over 300.

Creator
Dill Pickle Club
Date
1931
Subjects
Advertising
Gender and society
Homosexuality
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Anti-War Dance, 1918

Chicagoans organized many protests against American involvement in World War I, including this Anti-War Dance sponsored by the bohemian Dill Pickle Club. Critics of the war charged that large manufacturers were the most likely to profit from the war while workers were the most likely to die in the trenches. The war deeply divided Chicago's radicals. Some believed that it was necessary to remain loyal to the government once Congress declared war. Others urged active resistance to mobilization and the draft.

Date
1918
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
World War I
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Chicago's Interracial Debating Classic, January 25, 1931

Before the advent of television, lectures and debates provided public entertainment. Social activists used these venues to present their ideas and to educate their constituencies. This flyer promotes a debate involving A. Philip Randolph and Chandler Owen, both leaders of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP), as optimists, and Ben Reitman and David Tullman, both white radicals associated with the Dill Pickle Club, as pessimists. Although the exact topic of the debate is unclear, both sides supported unionization as well as racial integration. In 1931, the BSCP was engaged in a campaign to gain formal recognition as the union of African American porters and maids who worked on Pullman sleeping cars.

Date
1931
Subjects
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Dill Pickle Club
Education
Labor
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Randolph, A. Phillip
Reitman, Ben
Child of the Dead and Forgotten Gods

Born on a Mississippi plantation in 1908, Richard Wright moved to Chicago in 1927. While working in the Post Office he joined the Communist Party's cultural organization, the John Reed Club in order to develop his writing. In 1934, he published two poems in Jack Conroy's literary journal Anvil—not his first publication as Conroy typed at the top of this page, but his first in a magazine that claimed national circulation. Wright went on to write the best-selling novels Native Son and Black Boy. He left the Communist Party in the 1940s, and lived in France until his death in 1960.

Creator
Wright, Richard
Date
1934
Subjects
Communism
Literature
Working class
College of Complexes curriculum, 1970

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
1970
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
College of Complexes curriculum, April 1972

Topics addressed at the College of Complexes in 1972 included the psychology of sex, American Indian rights, and the future of cable television. Managed by Slim Brundage, the College was part tavern and part lecture hall. Decades earlier, Brundage worked at the Dill Pickle Club.

Date
1972
Subjects
Amusements
Education
College of Complexes curriculum, June 1963

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
June 1963
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
College of Complexes curriculum, March 1965

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
March 1965
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
College of Complexes curriculum, November 1960

Slim Brundage had been a bouncer at the Dill Pickle Club in the 1920s and the manager of a short-lived open forum known as the Knowledge Box in the 1930s. In the 1950s he opened his own club known as The College of Complexes. A bar and an open forum, the College sponsored lectures from all sides of the political and social spectrum, as these issues of the College's newsletter, The Curriculum, suggest.

Date
November 1960
Subjects
Amusements
Places
Chicago (Ill.)